The Top 50 Media Contact List — Yours Free

Get this free media list and other training delivered straight to your inbox every week… (It’s free!)

Media Training

I Was Hit in Aikido—and it was an honor

I was hit repeatedly at an Aikido training over the weekend. And it was an honor.

I was at a seminar from a Japanese Sensei who doesn’t come here often. It was considered a special occasion and rare opportunity for training. Some Japanese Senseis have harsher teaching methods than we are used to here. That is an understatement.

My teacher, Hans Goto Sensei, is gentle, but firm. He doesn’t single you out if you’re doing something incorrectly. Rather, when he sees that some of us are having trouble during a class, he stops, asks for a volunteer (typically, a high-ranking black belt or senior student) and takes apart the technique step-by-step so we can do it more easily.

In Japan, the sensei will yell “Dame!” which loosely translated means a combination of, “bad, dumb, wrong.” Or “no good; not serving its purpose; useless; broken.” Many times during training at Bay Marin Aikido, Hans Goto Sensei would say that if a teacher in Japan doesn’t “Dame” or correct you, they don’t care about you. So it’s good to get attention from them — even if it’s in the form of a “Dame.”

My “Dame” came during jo (staff) practice where the Japanese Sensei wanted me to use my body more and to extend the thrust. He came over to me and started yelling in Japanese, demonstrating how I was doing it wrongly and showing me the correct technique. All before the translator came over, who asked that everyone stop training to watch the “lesson.” There were 100 eyes on me as the Sensei was hitting me above my elbow each time he made point. Hitting me hard. I’m not sure he used the word “wimpy” to describe my form, but it was something close to that.

Aikido training technique

Aikido training

I kept attempting to make the corrections he “suggested” without success so he kept hitting and yelling. I kept my focus on improving instead of thinking of anything else. I had seen the other black belts he’d “Damed” turn bright red and start to tremble. I was determined not to do that, but to maintain my equanimity and dignity. Some people in my dojo had already told me how he’d made one person cry when they visited his dojo in Japan. Unless my arm or leg was snapped in two, this wasn’t going to be me.

When I told a friend about this she said, “At the first hit, I’d be out of there. Off to get a latte and shopping for shoes.” Of course a part of me wanted out of there. The other part welcomed the opportunity to polish my spirit. As Rumi says, “Criticism polishes my mirror.” My work will be done when nothing can scare, annoy, irritate, anger, or ruffle me. That is a long way off.

This is the same kind of training you’ll need for media interviews so you can stay “on message.” When a host or other guests “Dames” you you’ll be able to keep your equanimity and say what you came to say to your audience with ease and grace. It’s what I share in my sound bite course minus the hitting and yelling. Which you can get for the next 7 days for 50% off by using coupon code: BITE.

RESOURCES

I’ve just finished creating a live course on verbal self-defense for girls. It is available to license. If this is something that your school, organization, or club is interested in please jet me an email. If you want to make sure that your daughter avoids the Trump Pu—sy grab, this would be the training for her.


Make Your Sound Bites Steal-able With One-Liners


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Make Your Sound Bites Steal-able With One-Liners

Create steal-able sound bites so your audience remembers them and you. You can make memorable sound bites with one-liners like these.

Today I want to talk about sound bites. First just what they are and then to share with you a couple of really great ones from famous people and also from people who have been in my Your Signature Sound Bites course or who have been my clients.

What are sound bites? Mark Twain weighs in

So what are sound bites first? I love when Mark Twain was asked about what a maximum is. He said: “Define that” and he said it's a minimum of sound to a maximum of sense. So sound bites are really just your key phrases. They're not mysterious, they’re your key phrases, they're fascinating facts, they’re anecdotes, they’re stories, they’re vignettes. They’re stories, statistics, facts, anecdotes, analogies, acronyms.

And you have a mix of these. So it's not like sound bites are your whole conversation, they're woven skillfully into the conversation. But one thing that's really key in a sound bite is that it's packed with meaning and that it is memorable and repeatable. Whether it's a story or a fact or just a one-liner, you want that to be embedded in the memory of the person and also in their hearts so they really feel it.

One of the most famous sound bites is...

So I was just looking over one of my past blog posts and what phrase did I find in there? "Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee." Muhammad Ali describing himself. He was his own best publicist. So I float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. I mean that was such a great description of what he does in the boxing ring and now we've heard that hundreds of times since he just passed. So that's a really great one liner. So that really sticks in your mind.

The Oxymoron sound bite

Now I want to give you one that's maybe not quite as memorable but that is something that I really loved. And this is by Amos As. So I’m going to take a quick peek over here in my document. I was listening to him, he’s an Israeli author and I heard him speak a while back and he's so passionate, so vibrant and very lovely.

He said, “I thought that my book which is called A Tale of Love and Darkness would only be of interest to people in my village or my vintage. But I found that the more local I was, the more universal my message.”

That's a different kind of sound bite. I mean that's a little bit more intellectual but I really like that phrase in there too “from my village or my vintage.” That's the part that may stick in your mind. And then here's what he said about the sound bite he says “I love Israel in the moments when I don't like it.”

And I love this because this really captures his whole philosophy of loving his land and yet fighting for peace. So it's kind of an oxymoron. Fighting for peace. That’s kind of like in your head like “Whaaat?” So that's what partly makes it memorable. It's kind of a little kooky. You got the two opposing ideas. So that's why I thought that was really powerful.

The light, funny sound bite

And then another one that's on the lighter side for example from my clients who were also in this seminar. Kelly Kitty and Jennifer O'Neil. They’re authors of the book called Decorating with Funky Shui: How to Lighten Up, Loosen Up, and Have Fun Decorating Your Home. Great name right? That's kind of a pun in itself right? A sound bite in itself. They define Funky Shui as less about wind chimes and more about snow globes. So that's their sound bite for describing their book, which you should have by the way. If you're describing your book you do want kind of a one-liner that tells what your book is about.

storytelling tips for media appearances

storytelling tips

And then the sound bite that I loved which was in their romance chapter about your bedroom is “A single white rosebud in a glass vase represents chastity so you don't have to.” Ok so that's funny, it's cute and you definitely get a visual image. So that's what we're talking about sound bites too is that you want a sound bite that gives you a feeling, makes you see something, hear it and remember it.

The analogy sound bite

Then another one is from my client who also took my Your signature sound bites course Marty Friedman. He did private one-on-one coaching with me. He's a successful management consultant of 25 years. And now he's also an expert in men in marriage.

And he says: “The biggest mistake men in marriage make is in relationships because they think of their marriage like a refrigerator. They expect it to run by itself, plug it in and go.” So that kind of sums up in a few words the essential difference between men and women, right? It's not going to plug and play.

chow to create memorable messages

create memorable messages

The alliteration sound bite packed with meaning

And another one liner that a client I came up with Kelli  my god I can't believe I’m forgetting he last name. So when that happens you just need to go on. So she [Kelli Fox] owned Astrology.com and sold it to iVillage for 80 million dollars. And one of the things that we came up with is “astrology is a guide not a god.”

So that was a line that was so good that any host who was introducing her when she was doing a TV show stole. So you want to have these really great lines. Hopefully you don't want the media to steal them because lots of times they do and then you have to come up with another great line because they’ve already taken your best one.

But anyway that's such a great line “astrology is a guide not a god” that it does get stolen. You want to have your sound bites so they're stealable, right? But the point is that even if the journalist doesn't, you want your audience to steal it and take it for their own.

So that's it for some sound bite examples. Those were different examples of one-liners. You had the one from Muhammad Ali that was the one-liner describing himself. The other one from Amos Oz that was a little bit more of his relationship with his country. And then Kitty and her sister Jennifer the O'Neil sisters authors of Funky Shui that was kind of like funny. And then you've got Marty who created a great analogy.

So you've got all of these different types. So you can see the range of sound bites where you have this kind of way that you have to explore and be creative. Have some fun, humor, pathos, whatever that is that will move your audience. So think about those kinds of things that you can weave into the conversation that will be memorable or make people feel.

So I will look forward to connecting to you soon. And if you have a great sound bite please send it to me at mgr@prsecretstore.com I would love to hear your great sound bite. Or just record it into speakpipe right on this page.

RESOURCES

Watch the webinar 5 Ways to Double Your Business With Media Appearances in the Next 90 Days (It’s free!)

Download the 5 awesome tips to prepare you for a TV interview free PDF (It’s free!)

Media Training Tips for CEOs

Media Training Tips for Entrepreneurs, Authors, Coaches, Consultants, CEOs

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


Why I Can’t Stand The Cult of Fake Authenticity


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Why I Can't Stand The Cult of Fake Authenticity

Today I want to talk about something that’s been really bugging me lately. It’s what I’m calling the cult of fake authenticity. It's about how to be authentic. I was having lunch with a friend and we were talking about this whole idea, how there’s this kind of cult of oversharing.

And I wonder if you feel this way too. I would love for you to weigh in about it.

Battered by intimacy

Do you ever feel battered by intimacy? That people share so much and share such hurtful, harmful, hard to hear things that it’s actually hard for you to hold it.

Especially when we’re in groups. I think more and more when people are getting together in groups, this sort of cult of oversharing is being cultivated and being brought to sort of a high level of a kind of expertise. Almost of crafting, like the over crafting that’s going on in social media and Instagram for example.

Cultivating and crafting our own authenticity

It’s as if we’re actually self-appreciating our own authenticity. When you’re: “I’m so real. I’m realer than you are. Can I up how real I am? Can I be realer than you? Can I even share more than you? Can I degrade myself more than you? Can I have a lower low than you?”

There’s this kind of self-admiring that doesn’t feel authentic at all. And it’s not even spontaneous. It starts to become cultivated and crafted and we’re starting to shape our vulnerability in such a way as to make it as dramatic as possible to affect people. And maybe even to one-up another person. Right?

The other thing is, my friend said, “I actually felt reverse shame because I wasn’t a sad drunk.” She is in recovery but she said, “There’s a bizarre sense that my story is worse than your story. Therefore I get even more accolades for having the dirtier, the grungier, the sicker, the lower, the more excruciating story.”

Self Degradation has become glamorous

So it’s kind of a reverse glamour that now this kind of degradation and hardship is actually turning into something that’s polished.

I was reminded of this when I was watching TV and listening to Ronda Rousey talking about that the media had said there was a time when she was homeless and she slept in her car. And she said “You know what? I just want to disabuse you of all of that.”

She said, “My mom and I had a fight. I went and slept in my car for a week. I could have gone home. I was just in my car for a week until I found an apartment. I was not homeless.” So there was even this kind of crafting that the media does of the homeless. The rags-to-riches, the homeless to celebrity status that we’re all I think kind of tired of hearing.

Raise your hand, let me know, are you tired of hearing these degradation to glorification stories? Because I know I am. And I long for real authenticity again. The kind of heartfelt sharing that’s not crafted, that’s not trying to one-up other people. And also that’s reserved for our private friendships.

Fake or real authenticity?

On the other hand, I really realize that there’s a place for sharing and caring in a group. And that that can be very lovely and healing.

But is this fake intimacy (I’m asking, I don’t know, it’s an inquiry) where we’re sharing in a group of people that we don’t know, this can be a deeply bonding experience. Question. Do you keep up with those people? Is that the kind of thing where we can really connect heart to heart and then develop these friendships over time?

Because I see it as kind of a reverse engineered friendship.

Usually a friendship goes along and we develop an intimacy and only when we trust someone do we start to share these deep dark secrets of ourselves. But in our kind of “blabby” culture today, what we’re doing is we get into a group and we skip all the steps that are typical in developing a friendship and go straight to the heart of what hurts most.

So is this a good thing? I’m asking. I’m wondering, what do you think?

I’d love to hear what you think!

RESOURCES

Watch the webinar 5 Ways to Double Your Business With Media Appearances in the Next 90 Days (It’s free!)

Download the 5 awesome tips to prepare you for a TV interview free PDF (It’s free!)

Media Training Tips for CEOs

Media Training Tips for Entrepreneurs, Authors, Coaches, Consultants, CEOs

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


A Media Training Transition That Can Save Your Skin


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

A Media Training Transition That Can Save Your Skin

This is a media coaching bridge that can save your skin in any situation where you don't want to answer a question or are caught off guard.

Our topic today is something that can be a lifesaver for you in a media interview. It is called a bridge. And what that means is that it is the bridge from the information that you don't want to be asked or a question you don't know the answer to, to the information that you want to convey to your audience and that you can do under any circumstance.

So for example you might be asked a quick difficult question or a question that's off base or that you don't know the answer to or that's completely off topic and you want to transition to the information that you have.

So an example and this is the bridge is “I don't know about that but what I do know is...” So this can be an absolute lifesaver in any circumstance. Because sometimes you might get an aggressive interviewer or an interviewer who is a little too intimate or an interviewer who is just abrasive or abrupt and it might throw you off a little bit. So you can use this transition in any kind of circumstance for any kind of question.

That actually happened to a client of mine just recently Diane Altomare. It was her very first interview about her book called “Clarity.” The interviewer asked her completely off-the-wall questions that were not related at all to the content of the book and even recommended a book about her competitors that was in the past. And start talking about that “Oh my god it's like a worst nightmare.” And this was her very first interview.

But since she had been trained very well on creating sound bites and transitioning to the information, she knew she could use that one bridge “I don't know about that but what I do know is.”

So it doesn't matter how off base or how nut ball the question is you can always use that phrase to transition to the information that you want your audience to know. Because that is your whole purpose of doing the interview, so you can convey the information to your audience that you want them to know under any circumstances no matter how crazy the question, no matter how abrasive, aggressive, intimate, whatever the personality of the TV host or radio host is. It doesn't matter. Your transition is “I don't know about that but what I do know is.”

So use that and I would love to hear how it saved your skin because I have a lot of clients and course participants who tell me how that one phrase did save their skin and I'd love to hear about yours.

RESOURCES

Watch the webinar Speak in Sound bites: 5 Surefire Ways to Get More Clients, Customers + Sales — and Become a Media Darling  (It’s free!)

Download the 5 awesome tips to prepare you for a TV interview free PDF (It’s free!)

Media Training Tips for CEOs

Media Training Tips for Entrepreneurs, Authors, Coaches, Consultants, CEOs

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


Media Training to Script Your Story of Origin


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Media Training to Script Your Story of Origin

This is about how to craft your signature story, your story of origin.

Your Story of Origin Sound Bite

Today I wanted to talk about how to create your most important sound bite. It is called your story of origin. It's called that because it's where you began and what gave you the incentive to create your business/book/product/service or cause.

The reason why it's the most important soundbite that sets you apart from everyone else is that it's unique to you. And also it's the most important sound bite because every journalist, producer any interview that you're going to be in, they are going to ask you the question: Why do you do what you do? Why did you start your business? Why did you write your book? Why are you involved in your cause?

So that is a question that you absolutely need to have prepared. What is it? It's the sound bite, which is the story that tells why you do what you do and how you came to either have the idea for the book or why you're involved in your business.

A couple of examples of stories of origin can be, they either start from “Oh I had this childhood interest that has carried me all the way through adulthood.” And you want to connect that together. It can be a hobby, it can be an interest, it can be a love.

So for example someone who is working at the SPCA for example has always loved their first puppy. So they carry that love animals all the way through to what they're doing today.

Your "Aha" moment Sound Bite

The second sound bite is called your “aha moment.” Oh my god something happened that changed your life. You had some brilliant idea or some thunder struck thing actually happened that inspired you to do what you do.

Your Thunderstruck lightening bolt Sound Bite

Another variation of that “aha moment” is a severe change or accident or this is another kind of lightning bolt that comes down to you that is something that shifted your life on a dime.

An example of that would be like Christopher Reeve who became paralyzed and then became an advocate for paralyzed people all over the world. It doesn't necessarily have to be a traumatic event by the way, but it can be just a dramatic event, let’s say that.

Your ancestral Sound Bite

One of the most common sound bites too is something that connects your past to your present. And this can be ancestral. This can be your relatives, your grandfather. your mother, your grandmother, or someone even further in the past that has influenced you to become the person you are today.

So for example my client Kristen Schuerlein who some people call “the blanket lady.” She's a graphic artist and left all of that behind to create these beautiful blankets that have affirmations on them.

She didn't realize this by the way. When we first started working together she didn't realize that her story of origin came from her grandfather who at that time during the war traded shoes. He created and repaired shoes and he traded shoes for chickens. He would make sure that every child in the town had shoes and then he got that food in return. And she said she didn't realize that essentially she's trading shoes for chickens by creating her blankets that she would then give to charities to help support them.

So connecting your past to your present is a very powerful way too. And sometimes by the way it's not like you know it right away. You know what your story of origin is. The process that I go through with my clients typically is let's just talk naturally and hear the way that you speak naturally. And start talking about how you came to be where you are today.

Because often times it's that connection that people don't see necessarily until they start talking out naturally. Because what I found in neuroscience - neuroscience proves this out - is that when you're not in your thinking brain, when you're just in a relaxed state and you're actually just talking freely, all of the right answers come.

This is the same part of the brain that lights up in jazz musicians when they improvise. So essentially what we're doing is we’re improvising with our talk, we're improvising as we chat. And then that beautiful thing comes out unexpectedly.

And then we craft that story. We craft it to have a beautiful beginning, middle and end. So it might come out perfectly almost and then we just craft it to make sure that it's ready for media.

So that is your story of origin. Whether it is a hobby or love from your childhood, an aha moment, a thunderstruck change in your life, or something from your ancestral past.

So that’s one of the first steps that you want, but make sure that you've got your story of origin sound bite down before you actually contact the media.

RESOURCES

Get your free copy of The Top 50 Media Contacts List (It's free!)

Watch the webinar 5 Ways to Double Your Business With Media Appearances in the Next 90 Days (It’s free!)

Download the 5 awesome tips to prepare you for a TV interview free PDF (It’s free!)

Media Training Tips for CEOs

Media Training Tips for Entrepreneurs, Authors, Coaches, Consultants, CEOs

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


5 Ways Your Branding Can Get The Media To Call You With Karen Leland


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

5 Ways Your Branding Can Get The Media To Call You With Karen Leland

Welcome everyone to the Be a Media Darling Podcast, today our topic is five ways your branding can get the media to call you. Our wonderful guest is a dear friend of mine, Karen Leland. She’s CEO of Sterling Marketing Group, which is a branding and marketing strategy and implementation firm, helping CEOs, businesses and teams develop stronger personal and business brands. Her most recent book, is The Brand Mapping Strategy, Design, Build and Accelerate Your Brand. To reach her, go to SterlingMarketingGroup.com.

You’re doing a TED Talk too. Did you already do your TED Talk?

I haven’t. Actually, I'm doing a TEDxTalk at Yale in October actually.

That’s fantastic. Obviously, the topic is branding?

The topic is actually of that whole Yale TEDxTalk, the theme is the gap. I'm going to talk about the gap between how people experience themselves and how their brand is sometimes represented in the world.

That will be a great place to start. There’s a lot of definitions of a brand. That you are the brand. Maybe we could start with what your definition of a brand is and why people should have one.

BAMD0021 | Get the media to call you

The Brand Mapping Strategy by Karen Leland

It’s funny because in the book, one of the things that I say is I tell people I'm going to play fast and loose with language because I use the word branding, and the word marketing, and the word PR, and the word social media, and the world business development. Not that they're all the same thing, but they're so inextricably linked in today’s world that they're really different facets of a diamond.

Branding in general, I like the definition Jeff Bezos gives about a brand is what someone says about you when you're not in the room. I really think a brand, whether it’s personal or business, is it’s your reputation. It’s how you are seen, it’s how you are viewed. It’s what people think of when they think of you.

That reason that I say that PR and social media and all of that is intertwined is that today, there are no just pure branding activities or pure marketing activities or pure PR activities. They all have a linkage and a relationship with each other.

We’re really talking about perception is reality and how all of those things still need to be consistent. Your social media can't look cutesy and wild if your website looks serious and buttoned up - that won't get the media to call you.

Exactly. The thing is that, the brand of your website and your collateral materials really need to match what the tone of your brand is, either your personal brand or your business brand, depending on which one you're designing collateral materials for. So many people have websites and collateral material that is just counter to their brands.

For example, I have people call me sometimes and they’ll go, “I use chartreuse in website design because my web designer said chartreuse is a really hot color this year.” Or somebody said to me the other day, “I used pink because I like the color pink.” That doesn’t mean that pink is the right color for her brand. As a matter of fact, for this person, pink was completely the wrong color.

People tend to think about designing their brand identity based on how they feel or what’s popular rather than based on what’s consistent tonally and energetically even with the particular brand that they have, either personally or business.

BAMD0021 | Get the media to call you

Get the media to call you by matching your brand to what you do for a living. This includes color choices, fonts, and language.

What should they start with? Let’s imagine somebody loves that color pink but it’s not matching what they do for a living or what they want to promote or they're offering.

What they want to communicate, what they're feeling they're trying to communicate. Again, we’re talking about color. Color is only one aspect. There are fonts, there’s design, there’s language. There are all these other aspects of how you represent your brand. Color is an interesting one because there’s a whole psychology to color. Colors will communicate to someone very, very different things depending on the color.

I think the place for people to start, it’s the reason, Susan, I really wrote The Brand Mapping Strategy book, the reason that I wrote it is that I think people need to start with defining their brands in some very specific ways. Let me give you an example that I use or an analogy that I use. I wear glasses. I know a lot of people wear glasses.

When you go to the eye doctor, you sit there and you're reading the eye chart and the eye doctor will put this big, heavy, gigantic thing on your face and he or she will click a bunch of different lenses. They’ll ask you, “Does this lens make it clearer or fuzzier? Can you see the letters clearer or fuzzier?”

The brand is like that. There are seven different aspects to your brand that have to be clear, not fuzzy and for you to understand and be able to articulate those seven aspects of your brand before you should be doing any brand design and before you should be even doing any brand building and putting it out there.

What happens is, people start putting it out there and building buzz for their brand but they drive people back to a website or to social media or to an online blog that is not representative fully of the brand. Then they lose people. There’s no conversion.

What are those seven things?

Of course, they are in the book.

Of course.

Of course.

It’s fully explained.

Absolutely. I’ll give them to you very briefly. The first one is what I call the anchor statement. That’s the go to statement about who you are. A lot of people call it the elevator pitch. It’s the very quick, who you are, go to description.

It’s not a tag line.

No. It’s literally like when you're at a cocktail party and someone says what do you do, it’s the one or two sentence answer you give.

I must say, “I double or triple entrepreneurs’ business using sound bites properly in their media appearances.”

Exactly. By the way, the thing that the anchor statement has to do is it has to be … People’s brains look for patterns. It has to be a pattern they can recognize. We’ve all said to people at a cocktail party or a conference, “What do you do?” They talk and we’re like, in our minds thinking, “I've got no idea what this person does.” We are totally lost.

As obvious as that sounds, a lot of people can't actually answer that question in an effective, timely, impactful way. It sounds easy but it’s not necessarily. It has to be something people, as I said, can fit into a pattern.

For me, I say, just what you said at the beginning of this. I'm a branding and marketing strategist and implementer. I work with executives, CEOs, business people on improving their business and personal brands. Everyone can get that. It’s understandable. That’s the anchor statement.

The other thing is the unique branding proposition. We always talk about, in business, unique selling propositions. It’s the same idea applied to the brand. What is it about what you do or how you do it that makes you unique, distinct, special? What sets you apart? I don’t mean by that, what makes you better than other people, but what is it that really is distinct about you? Again, a lot of people I find have not thought this through.

The third one is brand tone and temperament. What’s the consistent mood, tenor, quality, character, manner that you bring to all your interactions? Because there is a tone and a temperament that each person and in fact each business brings to their interactions.

Then there’s what I call the brand energy, which is what is it that you can be counted on to contribute in all circumstances and in all times? I've actually divided the brand energy up into a series of archetypes, which I go into detail about in the book. There are people that are advocates and people that are makers and people that are connectors and people that are motivators and people that are fixers and people that are visionaries.

As a matter of fact, you are in the book. I think I had you as a synthesizer. Yes. That was the brand energy that I gave you as an example for. I'm going to read what it says. You haven’t heard this. It’s short.

How exciting, because I apparently don’t remember.

It’s short. I think I might have just done it without asking your permission.

I don’t remember this at all!

It’s nice. I said something nice about you. Here’s what the synthesizer brand energy is. It’s, “People with this energy have the ability to bring together various elements, ideas, products, thoughts, etc. and combine them in a way that creates something new and improved. The types of statements they might make about themselves include, ‘I enjoy projects where I take multiple parts and put them together to make a new whole. I'm often asked to figure out how make several separate things work together and people tell me I'm good at blending and combining things together to make something better.’” I said, “For example, Susan Harrow is a media coach with a talent for taking information, blah, blah, blah.” There’s a little paragraph explaining how I think you are that.

Other words that describe that energy are integrator, blender and producer. That’s just one of about 12 different archetypes of brand energy. People are usually one or a combination of one or two. It’s very important to know which type you are because that tends to also determine the kind of language you use in your branding materials and how you talk about what you do. That informs it. Even sometimes the kind of logo that you create.

Number five is the signature story. Why do you what you do? What’s essential story that brought you to this place? How did you get here? What is it about your past and your history and something …

That’s the same as the story of origin.

Exactly. Same as your story of origin. The sixth is what I call the signature services, which is what are the core competencies and offers that you have that are particular to you. It may be a process you’ve created, it may be something proprietary that you have. It may be a system that you use. It may just be a particular spin or take you have on something.

The seventh one is what are your brand enhancers and your reducers. Really, what are your current strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as a brand? Really understanding those and addressing those. Those are the seven general areas. Those sound so obvious. It takes me an entire day, an entire day working with an individual or a team to have them to identify all seven of those things.

I don’t think it’s obvious to most people. Yes, it might sound obvious but I know that people have so much trouble even with the elevator speech and their stories of origin and their bio and all of that. It doesn’t surprise me that there’s a lot of trouble.

Just list the seven again, just so people can remember that these are all necessary to have a personal or a business brand that is going to be effective before you go out and start doing buzz for your brand, which we’re going to talk about that and how to get the media to call you in a minute. I really want to have people have a sense of what is involved in creating a brand so they can start to see what parts of their brand are missing from these seven. Or if you’ve got all seven, bravo for you, rah-rah. If you don’t have all seven, to start getting those aligned before you reach out to the media so you can have results you want.

Of course this is going to help you get the kinds of clients that you want too so there’s no chink in your brand or nothing jarring that people go, “Hey, that doesn’t make sense. That doesn’t jive with all the rest of the stuff that I've seen or read on your website or on your social media or meeting you in person.” Because all of that has to be consistent too.

If somebody’s an organizer and they show up and their hair’s a mess and their clothes are askew and nothing matches, even though they may be an organizer for a home, you're going to go, “I’d never hire that person.”

Right, because it’s an inconsistent brand message.

Exactly.

It’s funny, I was talking to someone the other day who’s a productivity expert. I went to her website and it’s chaotic. Everything’s everywhere. You can't figure out the path. It literally looks like somebody just threw stuff on her website and tossed it all up in the air. I said to her, I said, “The problem is the message you're giving with your website is totally the opposite message of what you say you do. At the very least, you're giving people, emotionally, a confusion.”

The seven are an anchor statement, a unique branding proposition, a brand tone and temperament, a brand energy, a signature story, signature services, and brand enhancers and reducers.

BAMD0021 | Get the media to call you

Having a strong personal brand is important when you want to get the media to call you.

Great. Let’s talk now about why personal branding is important for everyone who wants to get media the media to call you. We’ve touched on that a little bit but I'd love to hear more of your thoughts. Why is this meaningful for the media?

As you know and I know, because we do this all day long, the space is super crowded today. The one thing the Internet’s done is it’s the great equalizer. In the past, you had to be really well known or really famous or really big to get media attention, or really, really extraordinarily unique to get media attention.

Today, anybody can compete for that media attention by being online. That’s just the reality of it. There’s a huge amount of noise, a huge amount of competition, a huge amount of input coming at media all the time. As a result, they're more gun shy, number one. Number two, they're much more careful to screen for certain attributes before they’ll even be willing to talk to someone. They're not as willing to give people a chance as I think they were 20 years ago because there’s so many people out there who are not qualified but think they are, so the media gets an influx of that kind of content from people.

I think you have to be able to distinguish yourself and to build a personal brand. Otherwise, it’s very hard for the media either one, to find you; or two, when you find them or reach out to them, for them to be interested in you.

According to Wasabi Publicity by the way, with the new survey that they did, the number one way that journalists are finding sources is Google.  

You mean they're Googling the terms and finding the person?

They're Googling terms and finding the experts for those terms. If you're not showing up, or you show up and they land on your website and you might have a good search engine ranking but your personal branding is not 100% in sync, then they're going to go down to the next person.

Just to give you an example of that, I was being interviewed by a reporter for a newspaper - not a newspaper - a magazine, the other day. I asked her how she found me. She said, “I Googled the topic personal brand consultant and you came up. I went to your website and I looked at what you had and I was very impressed, blah, blah, blah.” We somehow got into a conversation, this conversation about looking for sources.

I asked her, I said, “When you go to someone’s website, how big of a deal is it?” She said, “I have found people who are amazing sources and would have been fantastic for my article.” This was a major magazine, top magazine. She said, “Who would be amazing for my story but their website is so poorly written, designed, or represented, or all three.” Sometimes one, sometimes all three. She said, “That I can't use them because if I use them, what will happen is a reader reads my story, looks at the source. If they go to that source’s website, looking the way it does, or being written the way it’s written or being as poorly done as it is, it reflects badly on me.” Isn't that fascinating?

That is fascinating. Especially since it’s a national or a reputable source.

It was a national paper, a national magazine.

I would think that pretty much all journalists are starting to think this way too. That it’s part of their brand and the credibility of their story and their sources. You're right, if a source looks shoddy, it’s going to reflect back on them. I think that makes perfect sense.

It makes perfect sense. I just don’t think people think about it like that. I don’t think people realize it and they don’t think about it like that.

Let’s talk about how that works in social media. Essentially, what the media does if you do come up in Google like you did quickly, is that they have to vet you. She goes to your website and then typically they go to your social media too. What are some typical branding mistakes that happen on social media that would turn the reporter off and not get the media to call you?

It’s funny because I had some people over for dinner last night. One of them is a PR person and the other one is a branding expert. We’re all in a similar profession. We were talking about a client that we’ve all worked with. This person has a book out and they're trying to promote their book. I said, “What’s their social media look like?”

We went on their Twitter and their Twitter had 300 followers and they were following 250 of them back. I was like, wow, that is not good. This person was trying to get on CBS and all these major shows. The PR person was trying to explain to the client, “The producer of CBS is going to look at your Twitter feed. If you’ve got 300 people who are following you and you're following 250 back, that’s basically saying you have no influence in your sphere, in your area, in you field.”

I think one of the big mistakes people make, for example on Twitter, is they follow all these people then they follow them back. They don’t really have a Twitter following. Your ratio of followers to following on Twitter, you should be 10% or less of who’s following you number-wise of who you're following. That’s one big mistake people make on Twitter.

I haven’t even considered that. I don’t even know how many people I'm following. I have to look at my Twitter feed. Especially since when you go to other things like Klout, they say, “We can follow people for you.” I'm thinking, I don’t want those …

No, that’s a bad idea. You actually don’t want anybody automatically following people for you.

No, I don’t. That’s one of the criteria in order to connect sometimes. They follow people for you. I'm thinking, "I don’t want that." That’s one part of it, the ratio of followers to people that are following you. What about the content of the feed?

As you know, content is still king and it’s everything. It’s back to that thing about there’s so much noise today. What happens is, if you don’t have quality content, if you're just doing keyword stuffing or you're just throwing stuff up there, if you don’t have quality content, one, you're going to be penalized by Google. Two, when the reporter or the producer or the potential client gets there, you're not going to convert and close that person because the quality of your content isn't being seen by them as valuable, useful, helpful, etc.

Quality content, if this is even possible, is more important now even than it was just a couple of years ago. It’s probably the number one issue that most people have in their branding, is that their content is not of high enough quality. That can be visual quality, if you're doing something visual. That can be written quality if you're writing. That can be quality of the interviews if you're doing podcasts. If you're doing videos, I don’t mean the quality of the video like how pretty it looks because the standard for video …

It’s more like …

What you're talking about, exactly. The value you're delivering.

What you're saying is number one, ratio of followers to followees. Number two, the content of your feed in terms of if it’s valuable and high quality and it relates to what your business is, I would think. Sometimes I see people and that seems fairly unrelated to whatever they’re doing.

Are there any no-no’s not to put on your social media that would turn a reporter off? Let’s imagine you’ve got lots of quality content, but you’ve got one of your personal interests, maybe something, a little sketch or on the edge or whatever.

The thing is with something like Twitter, there is an expectation that there will be something personal. With Facebook again, it’s on the edge of personal. LinkedIn, there’s really not an expectation for personal. LinkedIn is pretty much the straight business to business player.

The problem comes in when people post things that they aren’t thinking through how they're going to make them look. For example, complaining about a former employer. That’s not a good idea, and people do it. Some of the things I've seen are things like people talking about how they were driving drunk, the cop pulled them over but they got away with it. That’s just a stupid thing to put on Twitter or Facebook.

It’s anything of that nature. Somebody used to say to me, “Never put anything on social media you wouldn’t be comfortable if it were printed on the front page of the New York Times.” That’s always my rule of thumb.

That’s very good advice. What about anything that’s going to attract the media and get the media to call you when they see your social feeds?

I think one thing that attracts them is numbers. If you do have good social numbers, if you have a certain numbers of followers, that’s absolutely something that makes a difference. That’s number one.

What would be the minimum of good? What would be considered good?

I think if you're on Twitter and you have 3,000 to 5,000 followers, you're in the percent of people on Twitter. Having 40,000 is better but if you at least have 3,000 or 4,000, it’s obvious that you are a player at least to some degree in your game. If you're on Facebook and you have more than 500 followers, you have more than 500 connections, you're obviously someone who’s using … Excuse me, LinkedIn. I said Facebook but I meant LinkedIn.

I knew you meant LinkedIn.

I'm not sure for Facebook. You would probably be able to answer that better than I would. As you know, Facebook is not where my audience lives. My audience lives on LinkedIn. LinkedIn first and foremost and Twitter second. I don’t really used Facebook for business because it isn't where my audience is. I'm not super familiar with that.

Facebook is more the business to consumer place. If you're selling to consumers, Facebook is a great place to be. If you're selling to businesses, LinkedIn and Twitter are more appropriate for that market.

That’s such a great point because doing social media, when people feel like they need to do all the social medias, do the social media where your people are. One of my clients and one of the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul membership club participants, we did a podcast interview where … I will recommend that all of you go and listen to that. Where she talked about she had no list and she got 15,000 Twitter followers in two months and converted that to $40,000 worth of business

That’s definitely a podcast to listen to that will pop up on this one just so you can hear it, so you can use that strategy to get ready, so you will be media ready when they look at your Twitter feed. She had a really super great strategy for that.

We’re talking to Karen Leland and her new book, it’s called The Brand Mapping Strategy. You can find her information at SterlingMarketingGroup.com. Because we’re friends, we did a little interview over … I think you barbequed me up a fabulous steak and strawberries and cream, something super healthy. It was delicious.

BAMD0021 | Get the media to call you

The Brand Mapping Strategy by Karen Leland gives excellent tips on how to be ready for the media and get the media to call you.

Let’s go back to what else might get media to call you that you could have ready and be ahead of your competitors or other people in your crowded field. You were talking about how crowded the Internet is right now. How can we stand out with our brand and get the media to call us when they're maybe doing that search on Google? Or, when you responded to HARO or you responded to a query and they're checking you out to make sure that they choose you.

Let’s talk about HARO for a minute, which is Help A Reporter Out. As you know, I have a whole series of online programs. One of them is literally about how you use HARO and other online sites to reach out to reporters and have them cover you. Again, as simple as these stuff may seem, so many people are doing it so badly and inappropriately and they're missing the opportunity.

We’ll put that link up on BeAMediaDarling.com for this too. It’s a great resource.

The thing about HARO is that, you got to remember, if I'm a reporter, especially from any known paper or known entity or known media outlet.If I'm from Inc. Magazine and I put something out on HARO saying, “I'm looking for experts in time management to address how people can set goals for the New Year,” how many thousands of responses do you think I'm going to get within a five minute period?

A couple thousand.

Probably a couple thousand. One of the first things is, I always encourage people to put in the headline what [they are] actually they're responding to. Remember, that reporter, that media person is also getting emails for other things. I always put in the headline, it would be, “Expert for time management.” So that the person knows what it is that they're responding to. That’s one thing. It’s also, if you can sneak something in the headline very shortly about yourself that works, I think that’s great. I think the thing is, just the subject line is one of the first things that you have to do properly just in responding. So many people just don’t do that even well.

The other thing is, I always tell people, when I'm the media person and I put stuff up in HARO to interview people, if I get from somebody a block of text with no paragraphs, I am embarrassed to this but it’s really true, 9 out of 10 times, I won't read it. I’ll just delete it. I can't read a huge block of text. If it’s not separated into sentences or paragraphs that are easy for me to skim, it’s too much work and I’ll just delete it.

Most reporters I know have told me that’s the case. They will do the same. First thing is you have to make it easy for these people to read what you sent them. That’s number one.

Can I just say super quickly, that it should be the same on your website.

Absolutely.

Nobody wants to read that huge block. Just putting little headlines for each of your paragraphs so somebody could skim it and see if they want to read further.

Along those lines, one of the ways to skim is you want to put bullet points in that. You want to basically, you introduce yourself, you say why you're writing and then why you think you're the right person for their piece then put bullet point, bullet point, bullet point. If they’ve asked for something like tips, tip, tip or whatever information they’ve asked for. Your contact information and you're done.

I’ll tell you, a lot of times I get those from PR people when I'm the reporter asking for information and the PR person will not give me the contact information for their client. I don’t want to call the PR person, to get the client. That’s ridiculous. I know they want to control it a lot of times, but you really have to say the name of the client and their contact information. Reporters just don’t have time. They need to be able to quickly get access to what they need access to.

If you give them one extra step, then they're going to go to somebody who’s given them the ease of getting in contact with that person. It’s not just about your great content, it’s about the ease of which you deliver it to someone in the form that they’ve requested if you want to get the media to call you.

As soon as you are a pain in someone’s behind, you have just reduced your chances of them covering you by about 90%.

That’s a great point. What else do you look for? Because you’re on both sides of it since you write for Forbes.com and …

Entrepreneur.

Entrepreneur.com. Since you write both of them, you are also soliciting sources all the time. You're really on both sides of the fence that way.

I think the other thing they look for is people who really are experts at what they are looking for. Not someone who’s stretching the point and not someone who’s trying to pivot their story. They know what they need and what they’re looking for. Nothing annoys them more than somebody who responds who isn't really an expert or is trying to get them to pivot.

People have written to me, “I don’t know about that but you might be interested in this story.” No, because I asked for that. I asked for A, not for B. I will never use that person again because they're on my bad list for having wasted my time.

I totally get it. Are there any other no-no’s that won't get the media to call you?

Being long as opposed to short in terms of what you write the person, and being arrogant. I remember once, I actually have this as a slide that I show in my speeches when I give speeches on branding and marketing, I show this slide. I was once looking for a source on HARO and somebody wrote me back and they said, basically, I'm paraphrasing now, “But you better get in touch with me quickly because my new book just came out and it’s really a hot topic. I'm not going to be available for long.”

It took me less than a quarter of a second to delete that email. Reporters hate that. They hate that. They hate entitlement and arrogance. I don’t ever think it’s a good idea, but if you are Steve Jobs, you probably get a pass on entitlement and arrogance with the press. Unless you're that level, you should cut the attitude.

Also, never pressure reporters like that, “You better hurry up and get in touch with me.”

No. They don’t care. There are a million sources they can use.

What’s something that people should do to get the media to call you? We’re talking about some of the biggest branding mistakes also that small businesses and entrepreneurs make that impact their relationship with the media. Are there other things that they do that are total no-no’s?

I think you know this from the work that you do. I think when people are not really clear about the points they want to make with the media then if they’re doing anything on radio or on camera, it really ends up being a problem.

For example, I never practice a speech. I never rehearse or learn a script when I'm going to be on radio or TV. But you can bet, I know my 5 talking points or 4 talking points or all the points that I want to make and the stories that I want to tell. They are in my head completely. Then I'm free to just be myself and be natural.

I think the lack of preparation and really understanding what their main points are is one of the big problems people have when they're doing live media, like radio or television.

It’s about planning, preparing and practicing your sound bites so you can be free to be spontaneous.

Exactly.

You're right. A lot of people don’t have those down. They can be spontaneous but they're trying to remember what they're points are and the interviews and are not going to be structured tightly to help you actually get business from your media interviews. That’s the difference.

For somebody like Karen, Karen’s obviously experienced doing media interviews so she’s got all of her points down. She knows exactly what she wants to speak about for each particular topic and how she can twist each topic and use points for different angles. That’s something else to be prepared for.

BAMD0021 | Get the media to call you

Knowing your talking points in and out will set you one step ahead when you get the media to call you to be their expert resource.

Have we covered all the biggest mistakes, biggest branding mistakes? That’s an interesting way to look at it. I wouldn’t have considered that branding but I think it is because that’s how you're perceived live. Does that match your website and your social media, the feel, the tone?

I think it absolutely is branding. I would say the only other mistake I would highlight is that people tend to get this fear of missing out and they think they have to be doing everything. I've got to be on Instagram, I've got to be on Twitter, I've got to be doing videos, I've got to be podcasting, I've got to be going to conferences, I've got to be speaking, I've got to be blogging.

The truth is that what you have to do is pick one or two. People always think I'm nutty when I say that but it’s really true. One or two things and do them very, very, very well and very consistently. If you do that, one or two of those channels can be enough to build your brand.

You and I have talked about this, and I have the advantage of being a trained journalist and a writer. Writing is something I can do, it’s natural to me. I've basically built my business, my branding and marketing business on writing. On blogging, on writing articles, on writing books. That’s mostly the strategy that I've used.

In terms of social media, a blog was the biggest strategy that I used. My second strategy was speaking because the other thing I can do, as you know, Susan, is talk. No problem with that one.

The great thing is that you’ve deep dived into both of those. You have so much content on your blog and on your website. Obviously, with the nine books that you’ve written and then you're always speaking at conferences all over the world. You're getting clients that way but it’s also a way that you're consistently talking about this topic.

I also blog for other people. I blog for Forbes, I blog for Entrepreneur, I blog for AllBusiness, I've written articles for lots and lots of other people. It was a way to get myself out there. As you know, I just recently started doing the Branding Blowout Podcast. I started podcasting because that’s just more talking.

Exactly. Which we both love to do.

Which we both love to do, which is probably why we’re friends. We both love to eat and talk. I think the point of this is that I think one of the biggest branding mistakes people make is this feel this pull in all these different directions and then they do a lot of stuff, and none of it very well. That’s to me, a huge branding mistake. As opposed to doing a deep dive on one or two branding tactics and really being awesome at those and excellent at those.

I'm totally in agreement with you. Go where you're pulled. Like Karen said, it’s natural for her to speak and it’s natural for her to write and she’s really good at both of those things. Go where you're pulled and the media will see that and it will get the media to call you.

My friend Andrea who we just had on, Andrea Scher who we’ve just had on as well, is a photographer. I know Karen’s a photographer too. Andrea uses Instagram. She posts at least one image a day because it’s a visual medium and she’s all about joy and photography and beauty. Those things are in sync with her brand. She’s doing photography naturally, every single day. She pops those up on Facebook. She’s also a writer. Her deep dives are Facebook, Instagram and blogging. She started her following with blogging. She’s a beautiful writer. She’s got a very devoted following. Her followers also follow her on those other two mediums for the visual content.

You know you can just do visual content. I always use as an example, my friend Dewitt Jones who’s a former National Geographic photographer. He has a visual blog called Celebrate What’s Right With The World. He was a former National Geographic photographer all over the world so you can imagine how good he is. He, once a week, posts a photo that he’s taken with a quote. I think in two years he’s built it up to something like 17,000 followers. It’s basically all visual content.

What is it called? You’ll pass us that link?

Sure. It’s called Celebrate What’s Right With The World. It’s free and it’s really beautiful and inspirational and wonderful. It’s a great example of using visual content alone to drive a brand.

Are there other ways to drive interest and get the media to call you besides … Obviously, since he’s a photographer, that is very natural for him. You can take a look at his feed and see what he’s done.

You don’t have to be a photographer to do this. I love to take pictures too. I don’t even have a good camera, I do it on my iPhone. I do love that. I love taking pictures. I haven’t been posting those much because it takes so long. I'm going to hire somebody to do that because I actually love taking pictures. If you don’t love part of the process, contract it out.

By the way, I just have to disagree with you. You said, “I don’t have a good camera. I take it on my iPhone.” First of all, the best camera is the camera you have with you. That’s the first thing. The other is that, the iPhone right now is 10, 12 megapixels. The iPhone is an extraordinary camera right now. I basically use my iPhone more than I use my Canon at this point. I know a lot of photographers, including Dewitt Jones, he uses other equipment as well and who consistently use their iPhone.

If you like taking photographs, the iPhone has become an extraordinary tool for taking photographs, for placing on Instagram. Especially with all the apps that there now for fooling round with the images after you’ve done them. There’s an amazing amount of stuff you can do. I think the iPhone is one of the best tools people do have for actually starting to brand in a visual sense. Because it’s always with them if you use an iPhone, or if you use a Galaxy, basically a camera phone.

What kinds of things can they do to use their iPhone to help brand them that would be attractive to the media? What kinds of things can someone put on their website or on their social media that would get the media to call you?

For example, you can use Periscope now which is an app that lets you take really short little videos and post them to Facebook. Anybody that’s got a phone camera can do that. That’s one thing. There’s also Facebook Live where people can do that. That’s one way people can use the camera. They can also use it to take pictures and then …

Sometimes I take a picture and the picture inspires me to write about something. I’ll say, it’s very personal, I’ll say, “I was walking down the street and I saw this, blah, blah, blah.” I’ll make it into some story about branding or some blog about branding.

I just think that the ability to make your own media today with cameras that are embedded, with the cameras, the videos, the recorders that are imbedded in phones and then to instantly be able to publish them is an extraordinary way to start to build your brand in a spontaneous way. You need a planned way, but that’s the more spontaneous way.

That’s great. That’s a great point too, that there is the whatever is in the moment kind of publicity, as long as it’s well thought out and curated as well as the thoughtful plan for your social media, including blogging or podcasting or blogging or whatever that is.

Are there certain kinds of images though that the media, would be more media-genic for people on their feeds? Not that I want people to start just doing that, but to be able to put it in the mix. You do things that pull you or that draw you or that interest you or that inspire you to write a blog and then you can put that on their blog post or whatever medium you're using.

Are there certain things that the media might look for that they can either use or that attracts them or that says, “Wow, this is really interesting. This is an interesting person, I love their brand.”

Content wise, I think the answer to that is no, with two exceptions. You have to stay away from anything pornographic and you have to stay away from anything violent or illegal. Taking those three things out of the mix. I think other than those three things, anything really goes.

With this criteria, it has to be an interesting or well-taken or artistic photograph. It’s really the quality of the photograph or the interestingness of the photograph or what the photograph is communicating is what makes the difference, rather than it being a particular subject.

As you know from taking photographs and as I know from being a photographer and doing a lot of photography, every photographer, just like every artist, just like every writer, has their own voice. The more you develop your voice as a photographer, the more that your photographs will have a certain feel and look based on who you are. That is something that can start to also brand you because your photographs now have a voice. Just like your writing has a voice.

That’s a very good point by the way because I see some actually very well-known people’s Instagram feed that’s just a mess. I just think, “Wow, that’s so not in sync with what I saw in their brand or the quality of their brand.” Even though you're taking photographs, what Karen is saying is that they still have to be of high quality, high visual quality or be interesting and beautiful.

Because I've seen some that I find shocking where I was like, “I really like the website but it looks nothing like the Instagram feed.” Their photographic ability or whatever they're choosing is not in sync with what they're representing. I like that you could have your own photographic style that is as distinctive as your writing style.

You can. That’s something I have to say, I give Dewitt Jones a lot of credit for teaching me that. I came to photography fairly late in life. I was a printer and a painter and I had done all that for a long time, 20 plus years. Dewitt asked me if I wanted to learn photography. I was like, “No, I suck at photography.” He’s like, “No, really. I’ll teach you.”

He did and I think he really did teach me how to find my own voice as a photographer. It’s not only given me a lot of joy but I think … In my new website that I'm doing, I'm actually having a photography section. Not because I'm looking or anyone to hire me as a photographer but because I think it adds to the brand of who I am to say, “This is the creative side of me,” because there is a voice to my photography.

BAMD0021 | Get the media to call you

Showing your personal brand that blends with your business brand is another tactic to get the media to call you. Image from Karen's photography site.

There is. I've seen some of your photographs from India and from elsewhere that are just extraordinary. Just extraordinary moments. They don’t have anything to do with branding in that sense, but it has to do with that you love to travel worldwide.

It has to do with the personal part of my brand rather than the business part of my brand.

Exactly. What are the best ways that business owners can create buzz for their brand and get media attention?

First of all, we talked a little bit about keywords. Keywords really are important. Again, I find that for all the yapping that goes on about keywords and search engine optimization, a lot of businesses do not know their keywords. It’s really pretty simple.

One of the first things is, you got to know what your keywords and your keyword phrases are. If let’s say you’ve got ten phrases that get searched, or five, doesn’t matter, or thirty. I have a silo of thirty words that I know get searched for what I do. I start at the top of the list and I do a piece of content with that keyword in it, based on that keyword. I go to the second one then I go to the third one. When I'm all the way to the bottom of the list, I start all over again at the top of the list.

You just keep cycling them, of your thirty in your silo?

I just keep cycling those thirty through using those keywords and phrases one at a time.

If somebody doesn’t know how to get their keyword phrases, because the Google keyword tool is now gone, is there another way that they can find what their keywords are? Looking at their competitors …

There are pieces of software that people can get. I can't think of any from off the top of my head but you can Google them. There is software you can get that allow you to do that. SEMrush is one piece of software that people can use to do that. You can also hire people like me or other people who can help you figure that out. You can do it yourself by using some software or you can hire somebody. Those are the two basic ways to do it.

It’s not something so easy that you could do yourself.

It’s not that easy to do yourself unless you're a branding and a marketing expert and you can really know how to do that research. It’s not the easiest thing to do for yourself.

Great. SEO words and have about thirty. That seems like a lot.

No, I said I have thirty. Anybody might have between five and thirty. I have thirty keyword phrases that I use. Remember, my keyword phrases include the whole spectrum of what I do. Thought leadership is one of my keyword phrases, personal branding is one of my keyword phrases, CEO branding is one of my phrases. I have a variety of things that I write about that all are part of the mix of what I do and what I offer. Depending on what you do, what you offer, it’s going to be between five and thirty keywords and keyword phrases. That’s one thing people have to, the place people have to start.

The other way to build brand and buzz is to really come up with a content marketing strategy. Again, it could be visual, it could be written, it could be podcasts, it could be video, doesn’t matter. What is the content marketing strategy you're going to use to get out into the world what you do in a way that creates value for other people? Most businesses do not have that.

Therefore, they're not going to show up in that first page of Google when media is searching for them?

They're not going to show up in that first page of Google, but also when their clients go to look for them, there’s not really enough. If somebody does a search on you or me, a lot of stuff comes up that people can read that we’ve written, that has been written about us. People used to say to me, “Tell me about what you do.” Half the time now, when I say, “Do you want me to tell you what I do?” They go, “No, no. I already Googled you and looked it all up.”

They already know because there’s enough stuff that I've written and enough stuff written about me that’s out there now overtime that it’s created that brand. That’s why people need to have a content marketing strategy because otherwise they can't really get stuff out there.

That’s super important when it comes to being able to get the media to call you. What do you tell the people who are not the writers in terms of a content marketing strategy? Does podcasting count as content?

Absolutely. No question about it. Podcasting completely counts.

It doesn’t have to be writing. It could be video.

It could be visual.

It could be visual and it could be podcasting. It could be any of the other media when we say content. Lots of times when you say content, people think words on a page.

No. Content is content. It could be visual, it could be podcasting, it could be video, it could be written. Dewitt is all pictures, so no, it could be anything that is content. It could be tweeting. I know one person, his whole entire content marketing strategy is just literally 140 character tweets. High quality, consistently done. He drives all his traffic to his website from his Twitter. He converts people on his website for purchasing.

Could you say who the person is so they can take a look?

I can't.

Of course not. No worries. That would be great for people to be able to see what happens. I just want to emphasize one of the key things that you said, which is that driving people back to your website. A lot of times, when people are on Twitter, they don’t drive people back to their website. The whole point is to get people on your list.

The whole point is to get engaged with people so that you know who they are. I think the statistics are it takes something like an average of 6 points of contact before someone buys from you.

It’s actually now up to 10.

Up to 10.

It’s up to 10. It’s about 7 to 10 touches now. One of the things that we’re talking about is with your friend who, darn, you're not allowed to say his name because now I'm curious.  

Sorry. Non-disclosure agreements.

I got it. I love the idea that it’s just one strategy but he’s creating engagement. I didn’t mean to just say drive it back to your website like that. The point is that you're taking somebody to your website to get more than the 140 characters because they're intrigued by your content. That gives them the opportunity to get on a list and then to convert them to a sale if they're the right kind of person who’s interested in whatever it is that he’s promoting.

Precisely.

That’s great. Was there anything that we haven’t covered that you wanted to touch on about how to get the media to call you?

No, I think we’ve covered a lot. I wanted to say, the book is out but also I have started this new podcast, The Branding Blowout. It’s going to be up very soon. I'm interviewing an interesting person every week about the topics of branding and marketing and leadership and business.

Wonderful. Karen’s podcast is the Branding Blowout. You could also reach her at SterlingMarketingGroup.com. On there, you’ll be able to see her products and particularly if you're interested in how to get the media to call you and how to approach a reporter via HARO, that’s an excellent guide. Is your whole branding course available?

My whole branding course is available online.

I should say that it’s an entire course and it’s also available by module. If people don’t want to buy the whole course and they just want to know about the LinkedIn piece, they can just buy the LinkedIn piece or just buy the reporter piece. They can either buy the whole thing or they can just buy modules.

That’s terrific. If you do know what your content marketing strategy is and it’s just one of those, you can purchase just one module. If you don’t have those seven elements yet of the brand so you can get ready for the media and get the media to call you, it would be a great idea to go through the whole entire course. Karen and I have done some private branding things at Cavallo Point Spa.

By the pool, in our robes.

By the pool, in our robes, next to a roaring fire.

That’s where we do our branding sessions. I want to say, that’s actually a really important point that we didn’t point that we didn’t make today that we should. You're one of the best at what you do in your industry and you're an expert at branding and marketing. I'm really good at what I do in branding and marketing. Whenever you are trying to do some branding for yourself, you come to me. Whenever I'm trying to do some branding or marketing for myself, I come to you.

The point being that I think it’s super hard to do this stuff for yourself, even if you're an expert at it. If you're not an expert at it, it’s really hard to do this for yourself. I think people sometimes get into this mindset of, “I should be able to do this for myself,” when the reality is even the people that are experts, like you and I, we can't even do it for ourselves. We have to go to someone like each other to help us. I think that’s a really important point to make.

It’s a totally important point. I hired a media coach for my book tour for Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul. I couldn’t do that myself. You and I do that exchange, that I media train you and you help me with branding. It’s really hard to discover your own genius in what you do. I think that to take a look and see what’s hard for you and hire people for that and do what’s easy for you, that works and go with that.

Absolutely, something like this, no, I could not do it for myself. Either sound bites or branding. That was really helpful to have our session by … I was going to say session by the sea, but session by the pool. Delicious food and fabulous things at Cavallo Point. Karen Leland, thank you so much for being our guest today. I can't wait to actually read your book on how to get the media to call you, which I'm going to be getting in the next couple days.

You're going to be getting it when we go to Cavallo Point next week.

I can't wait. Thanks so much.

Thank you.

About Karen Leland

Karen Leland is the CEO of Sterling Marketing Group, which is a branding and marketing strategy and implementation firm, helping CEOs, businesses and teams develop stronger personal and business brands. Clients include AT&T, American Express, Marriot Hotels, Apple Computer, LinkedIn, and Twitter. She’s the bestselling author of nine books. She writes regularly for Entrepreneur.com and Forbes.com. The most recent book, is The Brand Mapping Strategy, Design, Build and Accelerate Your Brand. She’s spoken for Harvard, Stanford, YPO, the AMA and been interviewed on the Today’s Show, CNN, CNBC and Oprah. To reach her, go to SterlingMarketingGroup.com

RESOURCES

Hire Karen for business or personal brand building

Hire Karen to speak to your organization

Purchase the whole branding course – or by module

Buy The Brand Mapping Strategy, Design, Build and Accelerate Your Brand

Take the quiz to see how strong your brand is

Hop on over to Karen’s Podcast

Wasabi Publicity Survey on how the media finds you and what they are looking for.

 

Media Training Tips for CEOs

Media Training Tips for Entrepreneurs, Authors, Coaches, Consultants, CEOs

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


5 Media Training Tips To Become a Sound Bite Genius


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

5 Media Training Tips To Become a Sound Bite Genius

When I was media coaching sisters Kitty & Jennifer O'Neil, whose new book Decorating with Funky Shui, Kitty said something that I want to share with you.

"I'm going to try talking in sound bites to everyone."

What great practice.

Kitty and Jennifer are the kind of clients I adore. When I asked them to prep for our on-camera media coaching session they got out their camera and grilled each other for days. They scoured their book for their best lines (why reinvent the wheel? If you've been clever on paper, use your best stuff in interviews). They wrote out the questions they thought the media would ask. They mapped out their answers. They were totally ready to roll when my assistant turned on the camera and I played the role of TV host. Here are 5 media training tips so you can become a sound bite genius for your next TV appearance, radio or print interview.

Media Coaching Tips

Media Training Tips

1. Speak in sound bites to everyone.

Getting key phrases for concepts and ideas across clearly is central to all communication. As a fun practice try to shave off any extraneous details during conversation in your everyday life. In Errol Morris' film "Fog of War" former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara said, "Never answer the question that is asked. Answer the question you wish were asked." Begin to train yourself to speak only what you want others to hear. In this way you'll be shaping others' perception of you—which is the essence of good media.

2. Answer the first interview question with your sermonette.

In a 1989 interview on the NPR show Fresh Air veteran TV journalist David Brinkley said, "Everyone of them [his guests] will arrive in the studio with some little sermonette in mind, and determined to deliver it. So one thing I do is first ask them a dull, boring question like, what do you think about this. And let them deliver their little sermonette. And then we get to the hard core of what we're there to talk about." Your first and last points have the most impact so plan and deliver your sermonettes no matter what you're asked.

3. Frame your ideas for your audience.

Jennifer O'Neil, a film producer and director, explained that when shooting background footage (b-roll) she uses a technique called "grounding." To "ground" the camera must end definitively on an object or scene that signals the viewer that that segment is over. I suggested to her that she probably also used the opening footage to "ground" or shape the beginning of how she wanted a viewer to perceive the scene. In this way you orient your audience to the scene or the material you want them to focus on.

On-Camera Media Training

On-Camera Media Coaching

You can apply the same concept to sound bites. Your opening words set the stage for what you want to convey, your final words signify the close, how you want your audience to remember what you've told them. Use your opening and closing statements to anchor your audience to the information you want them to grasp. That way you shape the way they think about your product, service or cause.

4. Tell people what to do.

I love mystery, but this isn't the place for it. Don't leave your audience guessing. Be forthright about the action you want them to take by letting them know why your product or service is necessary for them to have a complete and happy life now. What gap does what you have to offer fill? Be direct in pointing this out so there is no doubt.

5. Live your words.

Get to the point with clarity and insight. The Latvian violinist Gidon Kremer said of composer Astor Piazzolla's music, "I don't think it's [the music] always about embellishment. I don't think it all can be expressed rightly just gliding on the surface of convenient rhythms. This music can't be in fact performed, it has to be lived. And I always can distinguish if someone is flirting with Piazzolla as a convenient item of our commercial industry or if someone really lives the life or the heartbeat of the music of this great composer."

It's the same with you and your sound bites. Are you living the heartbeat of what you're saying, what you're representing? If not, we hear your false notes, your commercial intent. If so, we know in an instant when your music is true.

If you enjoyed this Podcast you're invited to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. I send you a kiss for your kindness!

RESOURCES

Watch the webinar Speak in Sound bites: 5 Surefire Ways to Get More Clients, Customers + Sales — and Become a Media Darling  (It’s free!)

Download the 5 awesome tips to prepare you for a TV interview free PDF (It’s free!)

Media Training Tips for CEOs

Media Training Tips for Entrepreneurs, Authors, Coaches, Consultants, CEOs

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


Surprise! Stay Cool During Media Interviews That Are Whack-a-Doodle With Diane Altomare


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Surprise! Stay Cool During Media Interviews That Are Wack-a-Doodle

Diane has been a client of mine to do a media training. I think we did some strategic planning to systematize your website before we worked on staying on message during media interviews. Today, we want to talk about how you’re applying that media coaching to your media tour for your book and some of the crazy things that have happened during that tour. We want to talk about what happens when you have that Oh-my-God moment of, "I did not think that was going to happen."Let’s talk about your very first media interview and what happened and how you were able to stay cool during media interviews that go a little whack-a-doodle.

Thank you so much, Susan! It’s so good to be with you. The very first radio interview actually, I would definitely say, was the most difficult because I didn’t know what to expect in the style of the host which was part of the learning curve. It was difficult for me to embrace.

Every host has a different style, just like people have different personalities. Her style was very, I’d like to call it, unhinged. It was a sort of floaty and random. It was really hard to get a feel for, number one, who she was, what she was going to ask, and what was going to happen next.

Which in doing media interviews, you always want to expect the unexpected, but with her type of style, she would pause in between asking me a question. The way she would say it would be like, “Well, the question that I really wanted to ask you is…” Then, she would leave all the space as if she was pulling it out of thin air, and she actually was. Most of what she asked was not on the Q&A list that we gave her, or the bullet points.

It wasn’t even really related sometimes to the book. The first part of the radio interview within the first 30 seconds, she recommended somebody else’s book as she was introducing me. That was fine, however, it kind of took me off-guard for a moment. I really had to make sure that I wasn’t paying attention to that and rebound from her mentioning somebody else’s book even though I thought we were on the show to talk about my book.

BAMD0011 | Stay Cool During Media Interviews

Clarity: 10 Proven Strategies to Transform Your Life by Diane Altomare

That’s such a great point because if you start thinking about what happened in the past, you can’t be present for what’s happening right now; not letting that bother you. That is really a big thing in being able to stay cool during media interviews. That is a huge no-no.

The more experienced interviewers are, the less you’ll get that. The more talk radio, the less experienced radio hosts are more unhinged. You have to prepare for that and train yourself stay cool during media interviews. Maybe that’s also an opportunity to make a connection to your book. They could say in the future, if somebody recommends somebody else’s book, if you know that book and have to say something about it, or to say what your book covers to that book that didn’t and how your book is different.

Had you done a competitive analysis when you did your book proposal? Have you included that book? As I recall, it was one that was a little older, right?

It was really an old book. The good news was, I did read it. I was really familiar with it, so I knew who she was speaking of, what she was talking about. It really was somewhat relevant. It just took me off-guard. That was really what I wanted to share. It’s being what you said – to focus in the moment and let go of whatever may have happened in the last segment or last minute. Just stay focused and intentional as to what it is that you want to communicate, regardless of what the host does or doesn’t ask, or does or doesn’t do.

When you and I talked about this a while back, you also mentioned that you had to transition from her irrelevant questions into your material, because it was as if she hadn’t read any of your material, and she probably hadn't. Lots of hosts and producers don’t even have time to read your material, and they may not refer to the information that you give them. I know you said you gave them your bio and your Q&A questions but she didn’t refer to that.

Yes, she probably didn’t read the book. In doing subsequent interviews with people who really shared how much they love the book saying, “This is such a winner!”, “I was so moved by it,” or “I read it in a weekend,” it was such a different experience.

It’s just getting experiences and getting to be intentional, be focused on communicating, regardless of whether somebody has read the book or not; or what it is that is asked. It’s important. It takes practice. I definitely got better at it over the last few weeks. I’ve had fifteen or so, radio shows to practice which really helped.

BAMD011 | Stay cool during media interviews

"Just stay focused and intentional as to what it is that you want to communicate, regardless of what the host does or doesn’t ask, or does or doesn’t do," is how Diane was able to stay cool during media interviews that went off track.

That’s really super. Can you remember the irrelevant questions and how you transitioned and were able to stay cool during media interviews? Can you give us specific examples?

She asked me how the concept of inner child relates to a trigger and how do they relate? It didn’t really relate at all in terms of the message that I wanted to communicate. It’s indirectly related so I just started talking about the inner child.

I picked one of them and I didn’t really answer her question succinctly. I shared what it was that I wanted to share about the inner child. I didn’t try to make a correlation. That was something I learned at that moment on the spot: Don’t try to make a correlation to something that you really haven’t thought through. It may not correlate, or it may indirectly correlate, but I’m not going to put myself on the spot in this moment. I won’t try to sound eloquent about it because it won’t come out right.

I just stayed with what I knew. That’s what I learned so much from working with you, that is priceless. Regardless of what it is that they ask, if it’s relevant or not relevant, or they’re trying to compare something that doesn’t make sense, answer the question in a way that you are delivering what it is that you really want the audience to know. I did that really well as a result of working with you.

It’s so great to hear, especially since I remember we talked right after this interview. There are a lot of other crazy questions that she asked that we were laughing about because it was just so off-the-wall and irrelevant.

To have your first interview be like that was both good and bad. You know that. I remembered your publicist saying that she thought you did very well. Obviously, to the listener, it didn’t sound as horrible as you might have thought in your mind, for all those times when you said, “Oh my God! I was just waiting for the other shoe to drop,” every time she would ask you another question. You were like, “Oh no! What could it possibly be?”

In one transition, and I know you know this since I’ve been using it. “I don’t know about that but I do know is...” If anybody asks you a nutty-ball, nut-ball question about something that is so not relevant to what you have written about or that you know about, that’s just a wonderful transition line that can save you in any situation to help you stay cool during media interviews: "I don’t know about that but what I do know is..." Then you move into your planned point which you did beautifully.

Yes, it worked out well but I was definitely having some internal dialogue that was difficult.

Yes, that’s understandable. You eventually get to the place where you don’t have the inner dialogue. That was your first interview so that was a great thing.

Bear in mind, listeners, that to get a copy of Diane’s book – Clarity: 10 Proven Strategies to Transform Your Life, you can go to dianealtomare.com/clarity. To book an appointment, you can go to dianealtomare.com.

I know that your schedule is getting really booked. You’re starting to do many more groups. I mean, I know you have had groups before, but are you still doing one-on-ones or mostly doing groups?

I’m doing a combination of both.

She’s got some wonderful programs there to take a look at. If you’re looking for a coach, you can hear she’s very grounded and has a lot of experience in helping people, not just teenagers. Let’s talk about those four areas that you specialize in, because different coaches specialize in different areas. You’ve got a very specific focus on four groups of people but it’s also more expansive than that.

Let’s talk a minute about that and come back to some other of your interviews.

Perfect! One of the groups of people that is really near and dear to my heart, that I work with a lot is adult children of alcoholics. I have direct experience with growing up in an alcoholic home so I can lend a lot of insight, wisdom, and guidance as to how to move through some of the things that come up as a result of growing up in that dysfunction; and how to look at many of the things that you may have learned and honor them as gifts. That is an area that is near and dear to my heart.

The other one is women and mothers who have lost themselves and their identity, because for so many of us women and mothers, we are often spending a lot of time focusing on taking care of other people. Sometimes, we put our own desires and dreams on the back burner. If that speaks to you, there’s something you really wanted to create but you keep putting it off, I would love to help you be able to make your desire your reality.

Professionals that are ready to move to a career that’s more aligned of who they are but aren’t really sure what that looks like. For many people, we get stuck in the identity that we’ve created for twenty years, thirty years; maybe forty years you’ve been in the same career. You know that you are evolving past it, but you don’t know what to do or how to use what it is that you have learned to transition into something else.

BAMD0011 | Stay Cool During Media Interviews

Important to remember in order to stay cool during media interviews is knowing your true self.

I’d like people to also hear some of your key sound bites, just so they know what it sounds like, no matter how someone asks; even if I said to you to tell me a story of someone who really found a gift from something that they considered a trauma before, or a heartache, or something that is super hard in their lives.

I remembered you have a story of the box.

Yes, so the story of a transference box; it’s looking at what it is that we are wrapping our daily emotions in. It is being able to be not only focused on actions we’re taking, but specifically the energy that we’re wrapping that action in and the emotion.

What happens is as we give, and I share this story in Clarity, the gift of our time into somebody, what we really want to pay attention to is what that box is wrapped up in. I give two different examples in the book. One is that you show up with the gift of your time. That box is wrapped up in the most exquisite wrapping paper and it has this amazing bow. You feel loving when you give the gift of your time, and the person that's receiving that feels loved.

On the flipside, sometimes we give our time and that box of time is wrapped-up in red and black-patterned wrapping paper that might be tattered and ripping at the seams. The emotion or the energy that you are wrapping that gift of time in is frustration or resentment. As you give that gift of time, that is what the other person is receiving.

Just by being conscious of what we’re wrapping in our daily actions in, we can get clarity on what we are giving to the other person and what they are receiving as well. It makes so much of a difference in what we are able to create.

You told me a story about you and your daughter.

My daughter gave me a box that is somewhat similar to the one that I just described. It was adorable, she was nine years old. She's my only child. She came home from school with it and it was a Mother’s Day gift for me. It was wrapped up in this beautiful silver wrapping paper that had a beautiful silver bow on it. There was a message on top of that box, I’m going to paraphrase it, but the message really shared that, “Here is a gift from me to you. Don’t open it because inside, it’s filled with love. It’s something that you will always be able to have from me because it’s what I feel for you.”

It was just an amazing validation that what I have written in Clarity two years earlier, it was, to me, a divine message. It was the exact story that I had written in the book that she giving me physical wrapped representation of that box.

I love that story. It’s powerful that you communicated that to your daughter by how you were raising her. Obviously, she hadn't read your book. You hadn’t been talking about it, but that she got that. It is part of your message that’s so foundational; that we are sending out messages all the time, in terms of how we wrap, whether it’s our time, our love, our energy, whatever it is or whoever we’re giving it to. That’s felt by whoever is receiving it in a very concrete way.

Tell us a little bit about some other of your experiences that you’ve had like a dozen radio interviews, radio and print - but you haven't done TV yet, or have you?

I’ve done an interview. It’s not TV yet, but it’s a TV post so I did a video. Yes, I’ve done over a dozen radio shows and some print. One of the radio shows that I want to share was a little difficult to shake. It was just a few days ago. It’s very fresh in my mind.

The host slanted everything so negatively. She would say things like, “Don’t you just think that people just need to get off their duff and just do it? Don’t you think it comes down to the point where people can just get over themselves and just make things happen?”

It took me a moment, and I used again one of the tools that you’ve given me. I just took a deep breath and I said, “That’s a really great question." Even though she didn't ask me a question. I needed to have moment on how I should rephrase it, and I said, "It is true that at some point people need to make a commitment and a decision to do something, but one of the reasons that many of us don’t follow through with the things that we desire in hearts and we want to do, is because we have something that happened in the past that made us feel bad about who we are. We can’t do what it is that we want to do. That’s one of the things that I've shared in Clarity."

I took it back to the book and I said, "That one of the things that I said in Clarity is really how to move through difficult things that happened to your past or the way you interpreted what happened or the way you don’t feel good enough, and are in fear of actually stepping into that next level in your business or in your relationship, or you simply don’t know how to do it." I thought maybe that would calm her down a little bit, but it didn’t.

It’s a thirty-minute interview but I honestly could not wait to get-off the phone with her because it made me feel bad every time she was saying, "Well don’t you think people should just..." She was being really negative and almost condescending of people who can’t get up out of that place of being stuck.

I keep bringing it back to the message, "There’s a reason we feel the way we feel. You don’t want to make yourself wrong for it. You want to look at it and honor yourself. There’s a great step in my book. It’s step 6 – the voice of your emotions. Even if you don’t know what you’re feeling, you can understand how that emotion might be expressing itself. You’ll be able to move through it. So it loosens its hold on you, you can actually start taking action towards what you want to create."

As much as I could, I just kept staying focused on what is the message that you want to share. I kept asking myself that question. Not engaging is the word I would use. I did my best to not engage in her negative energy but it was affecting me.

I didn’t like it. I didn’t want her to keep doing that, yet at the same time, I just had to keep delivering my message. It was a great example of how you move through something that is difficult by just continually standing in the energy that you want to convey and then giving your message.

It was such an important point, and here are three important points here on how to stay cool during media interviews. Number one is you said the title of your book, you never want say, “In my book...” We always want to say, "In Clarity..." and go forward. And then, as much as you could, you did not let the negative energy affect you in terms of influencing the answer, so you stayed on message and stayed on point with what you wanted to convey.

The third thing to stay cool during media interviews is knowing that you cannot control the other person, you can only control ourselves, we can only control our own feelings, our own energy and our own message no matter what the host says or does, or no matter how they make us feel in the moment. Even though she was so strong about wanting to continue on in that own energetic, that you stood firm in your own and continually brought it back to the points that you wanted to convey to your audience. The most important thing is what you want to convey to your audience. Those are three excellent things that you've learned to apply and been able to apply in a difficult situation, because it wasn't a one question thing. It sounds like you were mired in this negativity and you had to keep crawling out every single time.

I wondered too, if it was just her personality, if it was the way that she makes her mark. If I listened to her show again with a different guest, would she be still acting in that way or was it just because our conversation was provoking stuff within her internally - where she was annoyed that some people just don't get it and do what they want to do?

I am not sure what it was, but it was interesting that I just had to let it go. I had to internally remind myself, "Just share what you want to share." It was not necessarily this conscious internal dialogue, it was just a fleeting thought of thinking on what it is that I want to convey.

I do want to share, too, that I know we are talking about all the difficult radio interviews, but I don't want to make it sound like they are all this difficult and that you'll always have to try hard to stay cool during media interviews. For the most part, of the 15 or so that I have done over the past two weeks, I would say 11 or 12 of them were absolutely amazing. They all had amazing hosts, who were all so different, and interesting, and they really wrapped their energy around helping me shine. It was just maybe three or four that were challenging.

Tell us how, in a positive interview where you didn't have to try to stay cool during media interviews, you were able to do something that the host brought out of you that you would not have expected. One of the things that media interviews can do that is so amazing, is that you start to see where people focus. What is of interest to their audience and you start to see a pattern, and if you look for it you can see them focus on one topic that really gives them a good feeling and can really inspire someone. Did you find a pattern in any of the topics that those positive ones covered where you really felt alive and like that brought out a wonderful story?

I really did. I felt like there were many points on the bullet points that we shared that people focused on in the Q&A. I found it really interesting that there were certain ones that people really left out and didn't touch. In noticing that, and I'm so glad you brought that up, because it helps refine the pitch even more to really understand what it is that people are really interested in right now and what is really relevant.

One of the really great experiences that I had was, this host during the breaks would say to me, “I don’t know what it is that you are doing, but I have never been so transparent with my audience before. I am sharing so many personal things about myself and I'm not quite sure why.”

I told her, "It's been really great, and it has been such an awesome interview. I feel like your vulnerability and your transparency is really giving all the other women and moms permission to do the same and really honor what it is that they are feeling and to not be so self-critical and judgmental."

Isn't that really great? Where there is something else going on, because this goes on at so many different levels where you connect. We hope in our heart of hearts that we really connect with someone and that helps bring a connection with the audience. That doesn't always happen. We can't let that influence us either. This is a really wonderful thing that happened, and this is what happens in the best of interviews where there is a kind of way that you connect that encourages someone to be more vulnerable or a deeper person. That gets conveyed to their audience and that's lovely. That's a gift and one of the gifts, I think of doing publicity in that way.

It does open up the host, the audience, and it gives permission for people to feel these feelings that some people think is bad for having felt them, which you have talked about in your book, Clarity: Ten Proven Strategies to Transform Your Life. Our audience can go to your website, dianealtomare.com/clarity. To book an appointment with you, if you want to transform something inside of you that even if you feel like you just want more, or you feel like there is something you want to open inside of you, a career, something in your personal life - Diane is as you can hear and feel through her voice and grounded-ness, it's dianealtomare.com. She has group and individual coaching.

BAMD0011 | Stay Cool During Media Interviews

How to handle a difficult media interview

Is there anything else you want to share on your recent experiences, either do’s or dont’s of how to stay cool during media interviews? Or difficulties, challenges, or some wonderful things that you have been able to create this kind of wonderful feeling in an interview?

This was a personal experience, so it may be different for other people. There were taped radio interviews and there were also live, and they were different times and different segments. Some of the radio interviews that were live were 10 minutes or 15 minutes. Some of the taped interviews were 30 minutes or a whole hour. It really, for me, shifted some of how I prepared for it.

I, personally, loved the live interviews so much. I love the feeling of somebody driving in their car, and that they are listening to the conversation that I was having with the host for 10 minutes. It felt so electric to me and I really enjoyed it. I could feel the difference in the energy of the host, when it was a live situation versus a taped situation.

I also did a radio interview where people were there in the studio, and I could feel that that was more alive, that live energy feel. Although live may be a little bit more nerve wracking, in a way, there is also an energy there that I think really carries you. It helps you to just shine. I love it. It was awesome and really great.

It is a combination of the audience, the host, and you, that it creates that - it's not just you, but to think that when you are doing a taped interview, you are really speaking to people in real time in that same way. It is more of an act of imagination in that case than it is when you don’t have to do that. I could always tell if someone did it in a studio or with a live audience, and I never liked the ones in the studio. It seems so rehearsed and so read. Even though the live ones were not so polished, they were much more interesting and much more lively.

Anything you want to share to our audience, to people who maybe is about to have their first time out or tips you have for people who are new or even more experienced that are doing their own media tour or media appearances about how to stay cool during media interviews?

I would love to share about over preparing. What I mean by that is that I had my questions and answers typed up and they were on the wall. They are still there right now. I am a visual person, which is why it is important to understand what works best for you, if you are a visual person, being able to have those little sound bites and snippets in front of you, it gave me this level of comfort. Although, I did not always refer to them, I knew they were there. The energy of that information was there. Although, I would just talk most of the time and try to describe it so that it sounded more conversational than being read, I still had them in front of me. It is one of the ways on how I prepare.

I would have half an hour before the show to prepare for it, and I wanted to be so over familiar with the material, that for the 30 minutes before the show, I would read it, I would look at it, and I would just sit, get quiet, get grounded, be relaxed, and just trust that I will be able to succeed with it.

Being able to have it be fresh in your mind gives a level of comfort and confidence that you need. My left side logical brain is going to know what information that I'm wanting to share, so I'm not spending time being so connected to remembering what I wanted to share and I am just in the moment, grounded, and I'm relaxed and sharing from my heart. The way that I personally get to that place is by over preparing. Or just preparing, for me it feels like over preparing.

That is what I wanted to share on how I was able to stay cool during media interviews, that is essential just to give you that feeling of confidence that you are going to be able to answer any question that may come forth. Even the ones that are picked out of thin air that have nothing to do with your book whatsoever. Which happened once or twice.

People get scared when they are under prepared, and they don’t even realize that they are under prepared. Getting that level of comfort, it's about being prepared, which lets you become free to be spontaneous. Which you do that well, because you know your material so well you don't have to spend your mind power remembering it. You can spend that time and energy connecting to your host and connecting to your audience, and trust that you will be able to access that information because it's been embedded in your mind.

There is actually neuroscience to prove that, when you get nervous, cortisol rises up and blocks your short term memory. That is real science. When you have materials embedded in your long term memory, you can access them even if you’re nervous which helps one to stay cool during media interviews.

It is so important too, because I did a couple of video interviews that were on the spot. They were completely different than the sound bites that I had written down, rehearsed, memorized, and prepared, just because of the way that the host asked the question. It just had to come from almost a different angle, even though it was the same material. But because I had rehearsed that, and like you said it was so embedded, it just came out so wonderfully.

Yes, because it's not about blurting out the exact things that you have written down. It is about being super fresh, as you've said earlier. To make it sound like even though it's the 100th time you've said that, to make it sound like it's the first time. That means you might say it a little bit differently, even if you've got the best way to say it written down.

Jerry Seinfeld, he rehearses every pause and every word to hone his show and that's specifically for timing of the audience response. I think that people who do media start to do this too, and you don't want to do that if you sacrifice spontaneity. I think it's important to have that connection.

Now Jerry Seinfeld, he is such a master at it and has already connected to his audience even through it's not spontaneous, it sounds like it in the way that he pauses. That's the difference. If we hear you on ten different programs, we don’t want you to hear you saying the exact same things no matter how beautifully crafted your sound bites are, we do want that kind of spontaneity or a different twist on a story, or a little something that is the same point but told in a different way.

I think that is part of the fun too, for me as the guest. When you asked what has surprised me, it was that most of the time, I did not say it the same way because the host is asking it in a different way or just because they have a different energy so I would share a different story or something else came to mind. It was fresher for me, and it would sound more spontaneous and conversational. That is the way when we connect to people. Being connected to ourselves is the most important thing, which that is actually step one in Clarity. In order to be connected to myself, I can’t be in my head trying to craft what it is that I wanted to say.

I think that is a really great point, and you have got an enormous amount of practice with that and not everyone does. That's why it's so important to practice that, being connected to yourself. Also not to worry about what the host or audience thinks of you, which is a whole separate topic of trying to gain approval. That connectedness to yourself and connectedness to the other person kind of bypasses that approval devil.

It's really owning that you are the expert in whatever it is that you are sharing. I think it is a journey that we embrace it every step of the way. When we are communicating through media, we really want to let everybody know that we know and we believe that we are the expert in what it is that we are sharing because that will come across.

If you don’t feel like the expert or you doubt yourself in some way, there may be some inner work that needs to be done there to let go of those beliefs, or something maybe happening within you that you can really transform. That's one of the things that I help people do, is clear out whatever it is in the way of you standing in the space where you are communicating who you are and contributing your gift to the world in a way that feels good to you and helps people in the process.

So if you are preparing for a media interview and you feel like you have some limiting beliefs, or any kind of thing that makes you feel like you are stuck or held back, Diane Altomare is the person to go to to be even better at being able to stay cool during media interviews. Is there anything that I haven’t asked you to share before we wrap up?

No, I think it's been an amazing hour together. We covered a lot, and I am grateful for you. I would not have been able to do what I did these past few weeks in the way that I did, without your media training and coaching. It is honest to God truth. I would think of Susan often, it's kind of like a mother, she would be in my mind in the radio interview. That is also the one other thing that gave me confidence, I knew that I had the guidance, the training, and the wisdom of Susan Harrow as the expert in her field, to help me in an arena that I am not an expert in.

I am not an expert in doing radio interviews, I am practicing and I am working on it, I am doing well, but it will really take a lot of time to be good at it. I feel good with what had happened in the interviews, and that was the direct result of the coaching that I've had with you, Susan.

Thank you for that. You can hear on how I adore Diane and how I respect her, because, yes we did a lot of intensive media training, and you did a lot of the work behind the scenes to get that place, and also organize your thoughts and what you want to communicate to people, and practiced the heck out of it. You can hear how Diane communicates in this new way, it's not the same as speaking and talking to another person. It's like taking War and Peace and putting it into a haiku. It's a different language.

I want to praise you for taking things seriously and putting them into action way before your book came out. We've been working on this last year, so Diane has been preparing for that and letting it sink in. She wasn't preparing a week or two before her book came out, she was preparing as she was writing it, she was taking things from Clarity and seeing what stories she wanted to tell, what sound bites she wanted to craft from that and which new ones she was going to tell. Some of the experiences come from the book and some experiences come from her current clients. All this allowed for her to be able to stay cool during media interviews and not be tripped up by whack-a-doodle questions.

BAMD0011 | stay cool during media interviews

Stay calm during media interviews

Things are constantly transforming and some of the work I have been doing with teenagers and parents is really becoming profound. Step 6 in Clarity is the voice of our emotions. It is a powerful that I am giving parents to utilize with their children because there is a lack of communication. There is a disconnect.

The parents don’t know how to understand what is happening with their child, and the children don't know how to communicate with their parents either, other than they don't like how they feel, they don't like what's happening at school, they don't like how the parent is responding or doing something of that sort. Being able to give the parents the tool to teach their child how to communicate and how to share their emotions is not something that everybody knows how to do.

That really is one of the ways and one of things that has been coming through as I've been doing book signings, as I have been talking to people, as I have been doing radio interview, that is becoming a really important part of who I am helping and who I am delivering my message to. It's really been birthed as of very recently. It's an amazing journey and I've been learning so much along the way and I'm really incorporating that into what I'm sharing. I really think that's what makes it so fun and fresh and alive. I'm just really consistently connecting with where this book wants to go. I'm connecting with that and just listening too, and letting that energy just carry where we are going to go and what we are going to do.

That's so remarkable because I think that some people really try and constrict that. To be open to, and like you hadn't worked with that many teenagers and parents before, you had grooved in some different niches, but this is what happened. And as it happens, you are growing that part of your business and you are touching that part of your audience, and as that expands, the more you talk about that in your media appearances, the more it comes in. The more opportunity you have to expand that part of your business. I love the fact that media is transforming your business as you let it into the areas that are really interesting to you, that really resonate for you. That are obviously really resonating with the parents and the teenagers too, that's the two way street. It's opening a door that resonates with new audiences and that it sparks something new in you. I think this is really beautiful.

It's amazing, a really good feeling. It is being connected to ourselves and being intentional is important. Paying attention to what is happening and what is going on is what feels right. It allows us to open up. It is amazing.

Thank you so much for being my guest to talk on how to stay cool during media interviews. Diane Altomare’s book, Clarity: Ten Proven Strategies to Transform Your Life is something that you can get at DianeAltomare.com/clarityor just go to her regular website which is DianeAltomare.com. 

Thank you so much for talking about your fantastic experiences and how to stay cool during media interviews. A lot of things that you have said, will surely set a lot of people’s minds and feelings at ease to know what you have gone through and to hear some of the wisdom that you shared in your own experiences. Thank you for that.

Thank you Susan, it is so amazing to be with you as always.

About Diane Altomare

Today, my guest is Diane Altomare and she is the author of a fabulous new book called Clarity: 10 Proven Strategies to Transform Your Life. Diane is an integrative life coach to thousands of people, including teenagers worldwide, and for the past 16 years she’s been a beloved motivational speaker, a national keynotes speaker, and a workshop leader.

Through those talks, she has also helped thousands of people transform from a limiting past to an inspiring future. I love that phrase, by the way. She has been featured on radio shows including I Heart Radio. She contributes to Finer Minds which is an online resource for personal wellness information and enlightened ideas.

Diane received her certification as a Master Level Coach from the Ford Institute of Integrated Coaching founded by Debbie Ford. She divides her time between sunny in beautiful California and Rainy Seattle, which she describes as the best of both worlds.

I wanted to let you know that you can get a free excerpt of Diane’s book at her website which is dianealtomare.com/clarity + some bonus gifts. If you want to work with Diane directly, which I highly recommend, you can book an appointment right on her website at dianealtomare.com.

RESOURCES

Hire Diane to work with you or your teenager or join her course

Take Diane’s online breakthrough courses

Buy Diane’s book + get your bonuses

Download chapter 1 of Clarity

Want to prep for a media appearance or book tour? Let’s chat!

Prepare for a media interview

How to stay on message and stay cool during a media interview

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 

 


4 Secrets To Becoming A Guest On Top TV Talk Shows


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

4 Secrets to Becoming a Guest on Top TV Talk Shows

I'm constantly amazed at the number of people who want to get on the top TV talk shows — but have never even been a guest on a local TV show or had a single TV appearance. This is like trying to run a marathon without walking a mile. I still get calls everyday from people who want to be a guest on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday, others who are launching a book, or have a product or cause they want to sell, who have no idea what it takes to get on a national TV show.

I can tell in the first 10 seconds of the phone message — and in an email — if I want to work with the person calling. About 90% fail the test.

Talk show producers assess you as brutally and honestly as I do. More so. Their job depends on it. Even after you've managed past those first 10 seconds you must maintain their interest with sharply focused sound bites or you won't make the cut.

So those first moments when you speak are critical. It's important to craft your words carefully, making sure the content pertains to what a producer wants. They want guests who are knowledgeable, thoughtful, witty and wise--and who are comfortable in their own skin.

A while back, I taught an all-day class to a division of the International Coach Federation. They were keenly interested in creating sound bites to get on TV shows, and we worked on that for hours. It was then I realized how difficult it is for people to be succinct, clear and to the point. While this podcast won't focus on developing sound bites (look for that in the future), it will be about how you can get a coveted spot on a top TV talk show.

Here’s how it typically goes…

The phone rings. You hear an authoritative voice say, “Hello, I'm the producer of...Good Morning America or the Today Show, or Fox News or any other top talk show, you name it.

This is your big moment, the break you've been waiting for. After you catch your breath what do you do?

Producers make an instant assessment of you in thirty seconds—or less. When you get that coveted call from a producer, you aren't just “talking” to him: you're auditioning.

How can I get on TV

Get booked as a guest on national TV

You are being screened to be accepted or eliminated as a guest on their show. How can you pass the audition?

Secret #1: Ask Before You Speak

Before you even open your mouth to start pitching yourself and your story to the producer, ask them a simple question: “Can you tell me a little bit about the kind of show you envision?” In other words, ask the producer the angle he is planning to take.

Doing so has two advantages. First, it gives you a moment to overcome the shock and to collect your thoughts.

Second, once you hear the producer's reply, you can gear your pitch to the type of information he's seeking. Listen closely to the angle that he's interested in and tailor your points to it.

Publicists often use this technique to get their clients booked on shows. They “get” before they “give” so they are in a good position to tell only the most pertinent information about their client.

Secret #2: Wow the Producers With Brevity 

Follow the advice of jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie: “It's not how much you play. It's how much you leave out.” Keep your list of talking points by the phone when you call a producer (or a producer calls you), so you'll be succinct. You will already have rehearsed your points so that they'll sound natural and inviting.

Be prepared with several different angles or pitches, different ways to slant your information. “Nobody gets on these shows without a pre-interview,” says publicist Leslie Rossman.

“Be a great interview but don't worry about the product you want to sell them because if you're a great guest and you make great TV, they'll want you.”

And keep in mind the words of Robert Frost: “Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can't, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.”

Secret #3: Prove You’re Not a Nutcase

If you are a nutcase on the air, the producer will lose their job. What constitutes a nutcase? You may think it's a positive trait to be enthusiastic (and it is), but anyone who is overly zealous about his passion is considered a nut.

Best-selling author and screenwriter Richard Price talks about this phenomenon as “The dangerous thrill of goodness.” He says, “What happens is you can get very excited by your own power to do good.” Don't get carried away by this thrill.

One way to tell if you're being too zealous is that you're hammering your point at top speed with the energy of a locomotive pulling that toot lever non-stop. I remember a man calling me up about how he was single-handedly taking on Starbucks — who, he felt, had done him wrong. He wanted me to promote his cause. While this could have been a great David versus Goliath type story, he was long on emotion and short on facts. Some statistics or figures would have tempered his mania.

Get major media

Get national media attention

But he also never checked in with me to see if he had my interest. By talking loudly and barely pausing for a breath, he appeared to be a man who wouldn't take direction well. His single-mindedness was off-putting, not engaging.

When you're talking to a producer speak for 30 seconds or so and then check in by asking, “Is this the kind of information you're looking for?” Listen for other verbal cues, such as encouraging grunts, or “uh huhs.”

Secret #4: Can You Make “The Big Point?” 

Contributors to the popular radio show, This American Life, hosted by Ira Glass, have taken to calling the wrap-up epiphany at the end of a story, “The Big Point.” This is the moment that the narrator gives his perspective on the story in an attempt to elevate it from the mundane to the universal.

Another radio personality, Garrison Keillor, is a master at it. He tells long, rambling stories (not good advice for you), then ties up all the story strands in a coherent and satisfying way.

As a great guest, you want to illuminate your story with a big standout point that helps the audience see the significance of your story in their world and the world at large. Rather than hitting them over the head with a two-by-four, you want to share your insights with a feather-like touch. By framing your story you alert the producer to the fact that you're a thinker and can contribute great insights and clarity to a story thus increasing its appeal.

I'd love to hear from anyone who has had success in getting themselves booked on a top TV talk show. Or who has been on a talk show and is willing to share some insider secrets to what went on from the initial call to their appearance. I'll feature you in an upcoming podcast.

Adapted from "Secrets To Get Top TV Talk Show Producers To Book You As Their Guest." For the rest of the secrets that will help insure your success when the producers call go here to get it now.

You never get a second chance to make a bad impression, says online publicist extraordinaire Steve O'Keefe. Don't lose the opportunity of a lifetime because you don't know the rules. This 20-page guide gives you exactly what you need to know to make the cut.

RESOURCES

Purchase Secrets To Get Top TV Talk Show Producers To Book You As Their Guest

Watch 5 Ways to Double Your Business With Media Appearances in the Next 90 Days (It’s free!)

 

Can't Figure Out Publicity?

How Do I Get Publicity?

 

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts

 


My Dr. Oz Experience With Laurie Forster


Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

My Dr. Oz Experience With Laurie Forster

Our topic today is How You Can Get on Dr. Oz Show - by learning from someone who did. I’m here today with Laurie Forster the wine coach who's a national speaker, a radio show host, author of The Sipping Point, I love the title by the way and great pun on words. She is at thewinecoach.com. Right now, as per usual she is on a tour. She’s touring all over the country. If you want Laurie to speak to your group, in your city, just connect with her at thewinecoach.com. Welcome Laurie, it's so great to have you here to talk about how to get on Dr. Oz. You are a former client of mine and you have made such amazing progress that I wanted to invite you on because you were able to get on Dr. Oz

That’s so big.

BAMD0005 | Get on Dr. Oz

Thank you. The Sipping Point is my title I created after reading your How to Get Six Figure Book Advance book.

That whole section on how to create a title?

Yes.

There are tips there how to come up with great titles. I am glad you liked it. It’s really clever and it is obviously something that people would remember especially with you and wine.

I am glad to be here to talk about my experience in how I was able to get on Dr. Oz.

You told me earlier that you did not send in a pitch to get on Dr. Oz. They contacted you which is really wonderful and remarkable. I think it is so important to have your materials prepped, your website, your information that you are out on the Internet. You need to be easy to be found because often times today what producers do when they are looking, is they go to Google and they go to the Lexus Nexus and Dow Jones databases to see who has written about it before that experts, and vet them. How did they find you?

That was my question not with the first interaction with my producer but certainly at some point I asked her how she found me. She said she Googled, “Wine expert New York City”. Which I think is in some of my keywords on my website. I travel all over the country doing what I do. I visit New York frequently. The cities that I work in a lot are in my search terms. After she did that, she found a segment that I have done here in the Arlington, Virginia area on WJLA to an ABC affiliate, how to drink like Olivia Pope in Scandal. I do not know if you are a fan of the show.

BAMD0005 | Get on Dr. Oz

I saw that on your website. I thought it was a good tie to a celebrity.

I had done the segment because red wine was almost its own character in the plot of the show. Olivia Pope has big wine glasses and always drinks this amazing red wine. She is very fascinating when she talks about it. Her father is part of the whole wine drinking association. Anyway since they saw the segment on ABC, they loved it and said that we need to have her in the show. It was thrilling to have them find me in that way. In fact when I first saw the email the title was, “Upcoming Dr. Oz Segment” I almost deleted it because I thought it was probably one of those emails sent by someone not affiliated with that show and selling all kinds of supplements and weight loss drugs. I almost deleted it, thinking that it was spam.

I will recap quickly what you did that lead to get you on Dr. Oz. Number one search terms; even if you are not from a major city, Laurie put in New York City because she’s nearby and she visits there a lot. That’s really important to set up your search terms in that way. So it is great locally anywhere because sometimes people are looking for you at a TV show in a particular city and they don’t want to pay your travel. So they are looking for people in a particular city. Second thing that you did right was create a video in connection with something that is super popular today which is Olivia Pope Scandal show on TV and connect it to wine.

She did it well by the way. I watched that segment and remembered that you really had that huge wine glass there which was really funny. It was really smart. You did your research. You did not just do anything without knowing. You did your research and connected it to something that is super popular, amusing, and interesting. You had the segment up on your website. I think it is on your home page. So the Dr. Oz producers can see you right away and see that you are mediagenic and the want you to get on Dr. Oz. They already know because you handled yourself on that segment, they already know that they can count on you to be lively and entertaining for their show.

They said that to me while I was there on the day of the segment, "Just do exactly what you did on the video that’s what we want you to do. This is no different from any other segment you have done," which of course is not how it feels inside.

Now you know they called you and they want you to get on Dr. Oz, their show. What happened next in terms of your conversation with the producer? How did that play out in terms of plotting the show together?

They had a basic idea of what they wanted the segment to be. What wines to drink or avoid based on your house ailments. They asked me if I was willing to help them with the segment and to be on the segment, so of course I said I will. Right away, Thursday as I remember, she put together the notes and I worked on it that day, I happened to be in the office. We went through talking points of each of the ailments and allergies, weight loss and headache are the things that we focused on and coming up with why you want to drink these wines and why avoid these others. Putting all bullet points for that, and I had all of that for them by the next afternoon. I definitely went after it and we also scheduled the taping for that Monday.

They called you to get on Dr. Oz Show on Thursday and you were on the show on Monday?

Well they called me on a Thursday. I traveled to New York on a Monday and for taping Tuesday morning.

Got it. That’s a pretty quick turnaround to get on Dr. Oz. Did they have the idea for the segment? Like did they know that they wanted to focus on allergies, weight loss, and headaches?

There was a fourth which was heart health. But they have already done some coverage for that in the womens’ heart health month, so we cut that for timing because it had already been covered. They already had this idea that they wanted an expert who could speak to which wines should be best to drink and avoid. I went about getting all the information and the backup which types of wines, not brands, so between Sauvignon Blanc or Chardonnay.

You did all the leg-work to get on Dr. Oz for them. They wanted three topics and you researched the wines and created some talking points for them within a day. Good thing that you were there because it does not happen as fast. Did they tweak them with you? Did they have a conversation call with you and after that was everything done via email?

Yes. After that everything was done through email. They tweaked and added some general wine questions. If you go to youtube.com/thewinecoach the segment recording is there. You see Dr. Oz is asking questions about serving temperatures of wine and some other basic wine questions were also inserted. They created a script from the talking points. I never had the visibility to the script, but I know they created a script for Dr. Oz's talking points about it.

BAMD0005 | Get on Dr. Oz

Did you set up the props too, was that something which you did for them? I think it something for others to consider if they want to get on Dr. Oz or a simillar show, is the props.

I brought three wines, the wines that you should drink rather than avoid, for each of the three ailments but they make it a practice not to share branding on the bottle. So what they did was, they called it greeking, I had not heard that term before but basically the bottles I brought they created artwork and labels for it that just said Sauvignon Blanc. So that none of the branding was visible on the bottle. I brought three bottles and they covered them up with special labels. They went and rented in the wine store some shelving and a bunch of wine bottles because we set it up like a wine store. If you watch the segment you will see exactly what I mean. There were three stations.

That’s great. There are other things that I want to say about that when you get on Dr. Oz. Sometimes it’s actually the opposite. In some shows there are what's called product placements. The product is being paid for to play sit. It sounds like Dr. Oz does not want any extra advertising or free advertising for the wines. It may be a matter of policy or issue.

Every show has their own policies whether they are doing product placements or not. Or if they are doing greeking which is not to show private labels when you are talking about particular products. So for you, knowing that you are going to get a lot of people going to go to your website and wanting you to hire you for speaking or listening to your show, how did you prepare to get on Dr. Oz show before you went to the show in order to maximize your publicity?

Certainly prepping for the segment itself I have a process because I do a lot of regional media already here in DC and Baltimore even on Chicago in WGN. I have a process of creating my talking points, running through all of those, and how I set up in my mind each image perfectly in those three stations. Even if I add one table I always have three spots and three talking points that I have to move to so it seems to work. Three is a magic number.

I did a lot of going through my segment in my mind and the sounds, lights, and little light sandwich which is a trademark technique of mine for people when trying the food and wine together and I really wanted to make that part of it. Since it is something that people always seemed to enjoy and remember when I am doing corporate events or fundraisers. In my mind I had the talking points. Here it would be great to talk about the wine and sandwich. Here it would be great to talk about red wine room temperature but it is really room temperature and medieval castle. That’s a funny thing that most of us don’t think about. Red wine needs to be chillier than we think.

BAMD0005 | Get on Dr. Oz

In addition just because you are on TV, regional or national, I heard from many people that it does not mean that immediately the phone is ringing off the hook and your website is shut down then you break the internet. That’s what we hope for, but it is not always true.

But I knew this would be a huge credibility factor and a sales tool for me as a speaker and doing what I do. So we put out an email to our list alerting people that I was going to be on the show. Mind you, just need to give everybody some time reference, I got the call and email on February the 5th and then on Tuesday the 10th was the taping, but my episode did not air till April 21st.

Did they let you know that it was going to air later?

At first they said that it would probably be in the next few weeks and that they will reach out after a couple of weeks. They said well if that did not fit we will let you know. I just lightly kept in touch without being a pest to find the date. I did not want to announce. I did not really make a big deal about it with anybody until I got the date. Because I have heard from other people that there are cases wherein people taped segments that never actually ran.

I did not want to jinx myself or get ahead myself in announcing something without a firm airing date. I think the Friday before it aired we got the A-OK that it was confirmed and that’s when we put out an email to our list and network that it will be airing on Tuesday 21st and tune in. W also followed up a week or so afterwards with, "Hey it is just there if you did not see it live on TV.

So you are marketing to your own people for credibility, remind them who you are, look at Dr. Oz, and also the information inside the segment. It would be a booster for your own client list to have you in mind or competing with someone else who has a really big name, booking in the next speaking engagement or hiring you personally. This can be something that can be tipping point to having someone choose you instead of your competition. You have been as a guest on Dr. Oz and you did so well on it. They can see how poised you are and speak in their event or work with them. Do you work with people personally too to do some wine coaching with individuals?

Not necessarily. I do some private events that might be milestone birthdays or anniversaries but most of what I am doing now is appreciation for corporations like MetLife, Merrill Lynch, or fundraising where people are really trying to raise a great amount of money for a worthy cause and wine can be such a great tool. It is a great experience at the fundraiser and create an upscale theme around the event. That’s the lion share of what I am doing.

Client appreciation corporate events, fundraisers, and anywhere where wine would be a great tool and enhancement for their particular event.

You know a couple of years ago I did a little stand-up comedy training and improv. Humor is a big piece of what I incorporate along the way with the wine education. Just a quick and much more entertaining experience for people who do wine tasting. That’s my goal: to get people sipping great wine and laughing. I think I got that both.

You did. I definitely noticed that. I have forgotten about your stand-up comedy but TV producers want humor as well, especially the ones that want you to get on Dr. Oz. They want their audience engaged whether it’s humor or pathos, they want their audience to feel. You don’t want to be crying in there so this is a great opportunity for people to feel good about understanding some of these nuances or these health challenges in wine you did that beautifully. 

Social media is another big way that we promoted that the segment was coming up, that I was able to get on Dr. Oz, and after it aired just get that out to our followers. Even informed people who are not aware of what I do.

Did you give them your bio on how you wanted to be introduced as well? It is usually one line.

I did give them a bio. I am not sure if they used it. I was introduced as Laurie Forster, the wine coach. After I watched the segment back, and this is such a huge thing that happens to me all the time, is that I was introduced as Laurie Foster not Forster. Laurie Foster was on the screen and on the website.

One quick thing as something for everyone to learn, you need to work with the producer to proof your chyron because that chyron goes on the screen. You just want to ask the producer to run through with your introduction, my bio, and my chyron. That’s something you want to do with them before the show. They can change it really fast in the back.

That’s good to know. I wish I knew that. I did not even catch it because I am so used to it being done wrong. I just didn’t focus in on that when I watched the segment the first time on TV, and then I looked back at it because somebody took a still shot of me. And I thought, "Oh no, that’s not my name."

BAMD0005 | Get on Dr. Oz

When you get on Dr. Oz or other TV spots, work with the producers to proof read your chyron for name typos especially.

I hope you contacted them afterwards though just so they can correct it. They can’t correct it on the show but they can correct it in the website. I would definitely reach out for that. Just for your information, maybe not Dr. Oz, but some shows do allow you to have an article on the website to continue the learning of the audience. Then they link that article to your website.

That’s another thing that you want to touch on ahead of time to see if they would like an extra article that would add some of the things that we can’t cover in six minutes. In that way they can drive people to their website and then from their website you can drive people to your website. Within that is the opportunity where you can offer something free, like 5 favorite wines that won’t give you a headache that they may - and you have to clear it with the producers, but if it is not on their website you may be able to encourage people to go to your website with a list.

People like to know the brands and the types of wines. That is maybe something that you could keep in mind for the future. To be able to do that here to give your favorite wines that might not give you a headache, make you lose weight, or good for your heart.

That’s a great point for the future.

Take us through the process with the producers. What it was like from start to finish. You have given us a sense of what happened with you beforehand and the back and forth process which is difficult on the TV. I just want to reiterate something that you have said, which is they may have an idea and segment in mind and ask you to flush it out. You are coming up with the question, Laurie, and you came up with three.

The other thing she mentioned, which was really brilliant is that she gave herself three physical things to do to help her take through the points. Dr. Oz has three different tables and three wines so there are all that goes with those three different things. That could be a great help for you if you are nervous to have that kind of physical grounding and also the props to help you move through with the three points that you have to cover quickly. That’s great that you already developed that for yourself and go through it in your mind.

I will also recommend to go through it out loud because Laurie is really experienced. She is up and talking all the time. You know what I mean. It backs up in your experience. If you don’t have this and you are not used in talking in front of crowds, and I mean, Laurie has got her own radio show. So she’s very fluid in that. She didn’t need to go over this exact point because she made them over and over again in different circumstances and she just packaged it a little differently for the show. Is that right?

Yes. One of the things that was different is that I am used to being behind the table in many other shows or a station where they have their culinary guest or segments. You are already in place with the host or hosts, sometimes there’s two, whereas in Dr. Oz you walk onto the set. It was funny. I watched it back I do not know if you could tell. It was a split second, we leaned in to shake hands. We had run through it in the rehearsal round. But for a second I thought that he was going to kiss me on the cheek. So leaned in a little bit further than I normally would, because I was trying to read the signals. It was more in my brain than it came across on the screen.

Got it. Sometimes you might run through it in rehearsal but happens a little bit differently when you are actually doing it. That’s just the way things work. What was it like in the green room? What happened in the green room? The green room is the waiting room where there is a TV screen so that you can see what was happening before you. What was happening back in the green room for you?

They did set up a hotel room for me because I came in the night before and a car service to pick me up which was wonderful. We were met at the front. We were brought into a dressing room. They have several dressing rooms for the guests. Other than the usual green room which I was used to, I had my own dressing room where the costume person comes in to see what you brought. They are very specific about wardrobe choices for Dr. Oz. So you’re given that in an email previous to showing up.

What did they want you to wear?

Light colors on top. Dark pants or dark denim on the bottom. If you want to bring a bicolored dress you can. They prefer flats, no heels. Although the two audience members with the ailments that came up to be on the segment with me, both had very high heels on. I looked like a dwarf. They were just very specific. So when I went shopping that weekend to figure out what I was going to wear it was a bit more challenging. No black and white on top, no graphics. There is a lot of things to think about.

You were pretty casual. Why did you not choose to wear a suit or something like that? You were pretty casual, top and pants.

I was disappointed because I wanted to wear a jacket, it was royal blue jacket, and they were very adamant against wearing the jacket.

You brought the jacket and they did not allow you?

They really prefer not to. I wished I had the jacket. We thought it was best just the top. It was interesting. What do you think I should have done?

I would have asked them why they did not want the jacket. Is it a matter of fit? Sometimes when you get on Dr. Oz or other TV shows they want the jacket super fitted because if it’s bulky it does not look good in TV. So if it was not a super fitting jacket they probably did not want it because it does not look good in TV. When I say tight I mean tight. Your clothing is typically tighter than you would wear. It is very form fitting unless it is not flattering but that’s what a jacket for. It is to give you a nice form fit. It beautifully hides all of our flaws, which we all have.

Also when we go on TV there are some things that help our form along, and if it is too tight people can’t breathe, but some sort of contouring and shaper is helpful on TV because everything shows up especially if you are sitting down. But if you are standing up too, you can see the bra lines and TV is unforgiving. I always recommend shapers, I forget what they are called, in order to smooth things out. It can also take off five pounds in places where you need it. It will smooth out a line that is not flattering on TV that we may not notice in person.

Getting back to your question on what to do you might have said, something like you will feel more comfortable and relaxed in the jacket. Therefore it becomes less about the look and more about how you are going to perform as a guest. Which they would be more sympathetic to. Like, "She’s going to be less comfortable so let her wear the jacket."

The other thing to do when you get on Dr. Oz and other TV shows sometimes is to bring several choices. If they don’t want the jacket you can say how does this one work? You can pop on another one. It is not a matter of wearing the jacket, it’s a matter of wearing which jacket.

I only brought one jacket but several tops and several pants. That tip you mentioned about bringing jacket options, would be useful in the event that they do not want you to wear your favorite jacket, but you have to be comfortable in your skin and have the outfit choice that is good for you.

That’s also one of the sticking points. You want to be represented as you want to be represented, not necessarily how they want. Yet on the other hand they know what colors and background play best on their set for the lighting, the makeup, and their own brand. So it is like a melding of that.

That’s where the questions come in first when you are in the phone with the producer. Running by questions and style to be able to see things like that. Would they prefer shorter form fitting jacket, if they say denim is fine, check about low rise? You do not want to get there in a low rise and they do not want it that low perhaps. You are always welcome to ask those kind of questions ahead of time. In the future that is definitely something. What else?

I had my own dressing room, the costume person comes takes the item that you’re going to wear and had them pressed and de-linted. I bought my own brush but they did that for me. We went down and had one run through with the producer, verbally, on the points that we were touching on. I was brought down on the proper time for a walk through. A rehearsal where we were just standing very businesslike no real major chitchat. Here’s where you come out. Here’s where you move to the stations 1, 2, 3.

Did they mic you up before you went to the run through or when you are about to go on?

We did in the run through. I did not wear a necklace because I was afraid that it will interfere with the mic. We did the run through, went back to the dressing room, and they ask for you to come camera ready hair and makeup. But they have people who add to what you have. They did more blush and fluff up the hair.

Did you do your own makeup to get on Dr. Oz?

Yes but the makeup artist added to what I had done. That is where I met the two audience members that were part of the segment as well. They were also in hair and makeup. From there, a little more waiting and then to the actual segment. Certainly I was coordinating props. Making sure that they had the right amount of glasses and pouring the right amount. So maybe I was more complicated than other guests because we were also trying to show portion control which is also a big problem in wine tasting. We think 3 ounces is a lot bigger than it really is. That was a funny part of the segment with the size of the glass and how much someone drinks.

That’s an interesting point to, FYI, because it's your segment is as much as theirs. You want it to run smoothly and the details that they might not know about. Let the producer and host know what you are planning to do so that they will not be surprised and they can play their part well. That is a part of the courtesy of being a great guest when you get on Dr. Oz. For the show itself what did you think went well? Anything else unexpected?

I think I appeared very relaxed in the segment. I was able to cover the all main points that were part of my talking points, as well as get in a few other trademarks like the wine sandwich and some other funny pieces about serving temperature and other information that other people might not know about wines. So I think I did that well, but Susan you have to tell me.

Yes. You were really relaxed and funny. I think you did a great job. You were very informative. I learned a lot too, so I thought you did that very well. If there was one thing that I might suggest for the next time, just make sure that you would incorporate a story of a corporate event or a fundraiser so people will know that they can hire you for that. Within talking about the wine sandwich you might have said something like, "In corporations when I speak to groups of client appreciation, one of the things that I tell them is that your wine goes with your food, in a sandwich." It is as simple as that. So it is not overly promotional, it is just letting them know that they can hire you for corporate events.

I also wish I had mentioned my book. I don’t think I did.

I think you can do that with your book for sure when you get on Dr. Oz. Ask the producer ahead of time if it is something that they can show because they might have been able to show your book. They can introduce you as Laurie Forster the wine coach, author of “The Sipping Point” and then they can flash that on the screen either with a b-roll or have it on the set itself.

These are the live and learn kind of things after you get on Dr. Oz and big shows. It's good to reflect what went well, what you love, compliment yourself about it, and give yourself a big pat on the back and then say what would I do differently next time if I get on Dr. Oz again, what can I learn from this, and what could I shift to make my next appearance better.

Is there anything you would want to do differently next time? You would mention the book. You want to send them an image. You also want to have that on a flash drive in case it is better for them on a flash drive. You might always want to have the flash drive with you with the cover of your book saved to it. Maybe some b-roll even though they might not have planned to use it.

If it is a really good b-roll they may even spend 10 seconds using your b-roll which would be great. From a corporate event, for example, to show you in some unusual situation with your wine. Something funny. Even a picture of you doing standup. I would definitely create a b-roll for next time you get on Dr. Oz and put it all in a flash drive with a cover of your book, and anything else that is trademark you. Anything else you would have done differently when you get on Dr. Oz if you had your way?

The main thing was incorporating that, casually, the corporate event or when I do a corporate event, mentioning my book, and coming prepared as you said with the graphic and asking if it could be on set. I think in a way I was thinking I don’t want to give them any reason not to have me back. Follow everything to the letter including the wardrobe that was my strategy.

Did you pitch them a segment while you were there to the producers so that they can ask you back the next time?

I did not. They sent me a nice email after saying how well they thought it went and I said I would love to come back. I did not pitch anything. Maybe I should have by now.

I think it is a bright idea. You want to do it while they are loving you. The sooner you do it and be fresh on their memory, the better, because they have so much on their minds so they move on.

Right. Good point. No time like the present.

No time like the present. Sometimes you want to do it right then after the show. You want to have your second pitch ready to have it booked. Right then and there. It’s like here are three other ideas or segments to use to get on Dr. Oz again. Then run it by the producer after the show at the appropriate moment. If you can get it in the book.

I just want circle back and say you are a really lovely guest. You were so relaxed. That’s probably one of the hardest things when you get on Dr. Oz and big national TV shows, to be relaxed and casual because an uptight wine coach is not. You don’t need that wine to make you more uptight. Your personality came out and your knowledge came out. The most important things came out. These are tweaks that we are talking about the next time you get on Dr. Oz. Each time you are just going to get better and better but you were a lovely guest and I can see how they would want you back. When anybody else sees that segment you were able to get on Dr. Oz, I think it is a great example of your personality and your work.

BAMD0005 | Get on Dr. Oz

Let your own personality shine when you get on Dr. Oz.

Can I ask a question? There are a couple of other shows that I have been developing relationships with the producers and certainly interested on being on. How do you best think this can used for everybody else on the line if you have a segment like this that you feel is a great representation? How do you use that to connect with producers on other shows?

The first thing to do is when you are pitching them, just put a link in your pitch to the video on your website. I know you have it on your YouTube channel, I would have it in your website. It could be embedded in your website and you might have it in a blog post about some of the experiences that you had or some information surrounding that on your website that you do corporate events, that you are available for fund raisers, have that all sort of surrounded around that video.

I would have it in your press page with your bio and your picture. You can direct the press that you want, to that page with that video on first and foremost because that’s really prestigious. They can preview you quickly. The one where you did the Olivia Pope, I would have that one out on the same page. I do not remember what your media page or press kit looked like but that is the order that I would put that in. Dr. Oz then Olivia Pope segment so that they can preview you.

I would pitch them and just say that you were on Dr. Oz. Pitch a different idea or spin on that idea. Do you have any stats of the popularity of that? Was it a particularly resonant show that resonated with the audience? You can say that for the pitch for the other people that you want on the show. It could be a particular thing like the allergies were harder than weight loss or the headache was harder than health.

You could pitch it like in one segment with those topics and go into more details. If there are any stats that you have in terms of what resonated most with the audience and the audience wanted to know, you can actually say that in your next pitch. Get stats on it. You can get it from the Dr. Oz segment. You can also get it from the Internet. Most people Google allergies more then weight loss or weight loss and wine. Whatever that is or if they are equal. I would get stats to back it up to create that.

You could also use the Olivia Pope segment once in a while if there is anything timely. Does Downton Abbey have a lot of wine in there? I mean I might create a segment around Downton Abbey, elegant wines that we still have, what’s not available, the closest thing to Downton Abbey wines, or how to drink wines like Downton Abbey. Any kinds of those things that are hot in the culture today. 50 shades of one type of wine for seduction. You can go on and on with the cultural kind of stuff and have a lot of fun with it. Did I answer your question?

Yes. Thank you so much.

Were there results in your appearance after you were able to get on Dr. Oz? You said in the beginning which is true, sometimes there is an immediate rush, sometimes there’s not, sometimes something happens later when someone hiring you says that I saw you in this segment and that’s the reason why I hired you over the other people I was considering. It happens in all different kinds of ways. What has been advantageous for you after the appearance that you were able to get on Dr. Oz?

We definitely got traffic leads on the website from it. So I know people were reaching out, maybe even people that were already aware of me but it was some sort of tipping point. To bring that back to the conversation, they were already aware of what I do but then after the Dr. Oz segment it was another reason to reach out to me for an event. Certainly communicating to our list before and after the segment has also generated a lot of people, either past costumers or people that we chatted to before but have not closed deals with. That’s certainly has been great.

Did you actually close any deals or is it more that you are having those conversations with people again?

We are closing deals every day, but I do not know how many I close that I could 100% attribute to the fact that I was able to get on Dr. Oz Show, but certainly I know that we have gotten leads. I have a person who does my bookings. If she was on the line she could tell us more, she knows better than I which ones actually came after seeing the segment and that should be something that I should probably find out.

I think that that is a great thing to track and the other thing in terms of results. Did you have an optimum lead magnet in your homepage for people who might not be ready to buy or hire right now, to connect with them later? I know you have "Book now" up there but did you have a particular lead magnet up there specifically for Dr. Oz?

We did not but maybe I can put that one in my next time what to do better category when I get on Dr. Oz or other big shows.

You can have something like lead pages to pop down or pop up that says viewers of Dr. Oz can get special excerpts from your book, get my favorite wine, or the ones I could not talk about on the Dr. Oz. You want to give a teaser here. My favorite wines that do not give allergies or headaches that I could not talk about in Dr. Oz. You might want to give those kind of teasers because you have a very specific niche which is wine lovers.

Right. That is something.

Not everybody is ready to buy or hire you right now. But you want to sell that wine. You want might want to reconnect with them when you pitch your next show since you sound like you have some shows in mind. Which is great thing to do by the way. Once you have been able to get on Dr. Oz or any other of those big shows, immediately pitch to other high profile shows. That’s the time to do it. Right away for other shows. Get some ideas together and pitch while it is hot. That’s a great thing to do. Just keep your good PR rolling. Do you have any other plans to leverage your appearance? Because you said that you are going to pitch to other shows.

Absolutely. Certainly we have added it to my press page as you might have mentioned earlier so that is the front-center video on my homepage as is now. We have three boxes to show people the main things that I do. Speaking. Media. Wine expert. The media personality box has a picture of me on different TV shows. Right now my web person will be replacing that with the Dr. Oz picture so that will be front and center. When you click on that it goes to the page with the clip of Dr. Oz. those tweaks are being made this week. I have changed my bio of course when I am being introduced to include that.

Have you included the logo of Dr. Oz in your media cloud?

Yes, I will.

Because that is an immediate kind of thing. You can put the logo on there. That’s a good thing to do too. You might want to think about putting your signature line in every email. Have you seen me on Dr. Oz? And put a link to it. There are people that might not have seen the segment that you were able to get on Dr. Oz in your list and since it is still fresh I would absolutely put that in your signature line at the end of every email as well as your book.

I get a little sheepish like people might get sick of me talking about that segment. I am not trying to overdo it. But I am sure as a PR person you are going to tell me that there is no such thing.

I can see you rotating it, that you were able to get on Dr. Oz. When you got a new one in there you will switch it out. But right now it’s still pretty fresh that you were able to get on Dr. Oz. I think maybe a year from now I would switch it out. But right now I think that that’s really terrific. Is there anything that you want to add that I have not covered?

The biggest thing was just a year before, I was getting frustrated, especially with wines, there are very few outlets on morning TV where you can feature wine and alcohol. So I just made a deal with myself that I was going to do as much local/regional TV as I could and still be able to maintain the rest of my business. We all know that doing these TV segments are an unpaid part of the business. But I wanted to do as many as I could and do it as well as I could. Then hopefully someone would take notice. I guess it worked, so don't discount your local market. Do what' you can in your local market and then adding that to YouTube is how I eventually connected with the producer.

That’s a really terrific idea because a lot of people want to go straight to the top because they know they want to get on Dr. Oz or a similar show. It’s natural like, "Let’s go to the top, let's get on Dr. Oz." Laurie you have actually quite a lot of experience since you ventured earlier in terms of talking in front of an audience, having your own radio shows, so you are used to speaking right now. That is really a skill developed over time that is not developed in one week.

The other thing is you have done a lot of local TV, before they wanted you to get on Dr. Oz, so you are used to the pacing of it and used to what is involved in it; everything from getting the right outfit and the right colors, how to manage your time, your movement on screen, as well as integrating that to your props and your information and also the sound bites that are going to drive the kind of business that you want.

So local TV is a really fantastic way to practice that before you get on Dr. Oz and big shows, and also like Laurie said it is a way for producers from bigger shows to find you. Because they would want to know if you are mediagenic and that you can handle yourself in a very short amount of time which are local segments are therefore you have 6 minutes as well. So before you get on Dr. Oz, they can get a sense of you on how you manage your time as an experienced guest. That’s what they want to see. You can be fascinating, funny, and entertaining if that’s your thing then fine, but you could be one who’s knowledgeable and one who can command attention to your topic.

Doing some of those segments and finding a media clips service where you can buy the video and have it in your YouTube channel because you don’t know if it will exist out there forever.

That’s a great point. I recommend that you embed it in your website and may need permission for that. I know we did for CNBC. But now it exists on in my website so they can’t take it away. You don’t want it to exist only on their website, you want it on your website. Because if they let go of it you will not have any access to it unless you buy it. How much was it?

The clip service that I use is $95.

You had a clipping service so you did not have to buy it directly. Just an FYI to people out there, you can buy it through a service or sometimes I believe that some shows would sell it to you directly. Is that right? I don’t actually know quite frankly. Sometimes they will give it to you and sometimes they won’t give it to you. Just the permission to have it on your site or have the option to buy it if they won’t allow you to do that if then part of their product plan. Thank you for that. That’s really important because you don’t want to have a fantastic clip and have it go away and not have control over it.

Thank you. This has been incredibly informative and helpful to everyone listening on how to get on Dr. Oz and what that experience was like. We are talking to Laurie Forster the wine coach, who is a national speaker, radio show host, author of The Sipping Point, and thewinecoach.com. You can see where she is appearing and if you want her to see if she is in your city you, could actually book her for an event in your city, for your group, your fundraiser, your corporation or your private group. Do you have size or limit? Do you have a minimum for a private group?

I don’t. If we have an event that would include me preparing the event, hosting, and speaking at your event. I do some speaking at women’s conferences. I have talked about how to create a recipe for your delicious life and I will come for any number of people, it depends if you want to budget and have me there. I love group of sizes from 25-300.

Excellent. At the thewinecoach.com you could see where Laurie is appearing in your city or nearby, and even if she’s not, if you want her in your city she can be your fabulous guest. Who does not love wine with food, right? Thank you very much it has been great to talk with you again about how to get on Dr. Oz.

Thanks Susan.

About Laurie Forster

Laurie Forster is one of America’s leading wine experts and author of the award-winning book The Sipping Point: A Crash Course in Wine. Laurie is a Certified Sommelier, National Speaker and TV personality who is not afraid to tell you her first wine came from a box. Her edgy approach to demystifying wine caught the eye of major networks and led her to guest appearances on Dr Oz, FOX Morning News, Martha Stewart Living Today and ABC News at Noon.

RESOURCES

Hire Laurie to Speak at Your Event

Read Laurie's Book

Find Out How You Can Get a 6 Figure Book Advance 

Watch Laurie Forster’s Fabulous Wine Videos

Get Media Training to Prepare for TV Interviews

Create a TV Segment That Producers Love

Media Clipping Service

Can't Figure Out Publicity?

How Do I Get Publicity?

Are you enjoying the Podcast? Then I invite you to hop on over to iTunes to subscribe, rate + review it. Here’s a quick video on how to do a podcast review on iTunes. (It’s simple if you follow these directions). Note: It can take up to 24 hours to show up on my Podcast. You're welcome to send this to anyone you think it would delight. May good fortune always follow you!

Want to know how to subscribe on your phone? Watch this video.

Want to be a guest on my Podcast? Jet me an email with your topic and a link to your bio here.

Send Susan a Voice Message!

Click below to send me your voice message with a question or topic you’d like to hear more about in my upcoming podcasts! I will answer the most pressing and popular ones in a future episode. (I’ll mention your first name ONLY to protect your privacy.)

 

Susan Harrow Podcast

I'm here to give you everything you need to get you ready for the media spotlight so you can live the life you dream of. Let’s begin together with the Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul Membership Club to get you set for your time to shine.

Subscribe to Podcast

Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on iTunes
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Stitcher
Subscribe to Be A Media Darling Podcast on Google Play

Podcast Reviews
  • A geniune way to build your business
    August 26, 2016 by Siriusjane from United States

    Loved this podcast. I found it very helpful and informative. Susan has a very open, friendly, riveting approach to promoting one's business and self. Her sharp insights and her real-life examples and guests can really help a business going from a start-up to a viral presence. I recommend this highly if you want to get your message out there with a genuine approach. Even the poetry speaks to the importants of our words. Check out all the episodes.

  • Invigorate Your Message!
    August 24, 2016 by Michele L. Plunkett from United States

    Winsome wisdom evokes and embodies the expertise of Susan Harrow; ensuring enlivening opportunities and outcomes through her podcasts and programs! Grow your business and income with the stellar style of Susan's endearing and enriching coaching! Susan Harrow Media Coaching and Marketing Strategies provide vitalizing results to invigorate your message when you implement her training!

  • Excited!
    August 24, 2016 by Delia McCabe from Australia

    Love Susan's work - her book and emails and short eBooks are all filled with enthusiasm and sparkle! So excited to be able to listen to her too now!

  • Susan makes publicity doable, authentic, + fun! !
    August 15, 2016 by SherryBelul from United States

    I'm thrilled to see that Susan Harrow is doing this podcast! I've taken a number of Susan's courses and I just love how warm, accessible, and doable her work is. Susan is an amazing trainer who is knowledgable about *all* aspects of publicity and media training, but she never overwhelms us with too much at once. She makes everything bite sized. (Sound-bite sized!) This podcast is no exception. You'll love the stories she tells to illustrate he points because they help make the information memorable. And she gives simple things to practice with. If you want to grow your business, I highly recommend this podcast. Not only will you love the training, I know you will love Susan's generous heart + authentic teaching style.

Search Podcasts