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7 Ways To Increase Your Pinterest Following

 

Entrepreneur Magazine’s Ultimate Guide to Pinterest For BusinessExcerpted from the new book Entrepreneur Magazine’s Ultimate Guide to Pinterest For Business by Karen Leland, Sterling Marketing Group.

What pushes one person or companies Pinterest past unknown to being a star player? In short it’s your ability to curate and promote content that is meaningful, attractive, social media friendly, and on message with your brand. To build up a bigger audience on your Pinterest put these 7 strategies in place.

1. Build More Niched Boards
Take a look at the most popular players on Pinterest, and it will become clear they have a plethora of boards, usually between 50 and 100, on average. It’s also obvious that those same users have gone to great efforts to make their boards as niched as possible so they stand a better chance of being found (and followed) by a targeted audience. For example, if you’re a cookbook writer, a single board named “desserts” that features all manner of sugary goodies would work, but you might draw more followers if you took that same board and split it into four:

  • Pies and cakes
  • Cookies and bars
  • Chocolate
  • Ice creams, sorbets, and puddings

By refining your boards to be more relevant to the people who are the most interested in those specific topics, you increase your chances of getting followers.

2. Jump on the Trending Topics Bandwagon
People, places, and events that are popular at the moment make great bait for finding new followers. Topics that are trending will be getting keyword-searched on the site, and if you have a pin that fits, you stand a good chance of picking up some of that traffic. Reachli.com says that pins related to trending topics see an average 94-percent increase in click-throughs. So it pays to pay attention to the trending topics on Pinterest and to what’s trending on other social media sites. A few great resources include:

Post to Your Most Popular Boards
For those boards of yours that have a significantly larger following than others, post with slightly more frequency. Since more people are following these boards, your chances for a higher rate of repins—and hence new followers—is greater.

Pinterest Infographic3. Follow High-Profile and Highly Relevant People
While the criteria for whom you follow should first and foremost be the relevance of their pins to your business and brand, there’s a case to be made for having at least 10 percent of whom you choose be the big dogs in their fields. By following these power players, you increase the chances that they’ll follow you back, repin, like, and comment on your images, and give you greater exposure to their large followings.

4. Use Keywords in All Your Pins
Paying attention to SEO is a significant part of pinning. The more on target you are with the keywords you use in your boards and pin descriptions, the more likely you are to draw followers searching for and interested in those topics.

5. Promote Pinterest with Your Email Newsletter
Given the stringent no-spam requirements that exist for email marketing today, it’s a safe bet that the people already on your distribution list want to hear from you. Several ways to build your Pinterest following with a newsletter include:

  • Announcing your presence on the site in a regular newsletter you send and encouraging readers to click through and follow you.
  • Sending out a pithy, photo-heavy announcement about your Pinterest, inspiring your tribe to find out more.
  • Enticing readers to visit your Pinterest by placing a Pinterest icon that links through to your page on all email newsletter communications and featuring a “hot” pin or two you’ve recently posted.

6. Add Pinterest to Your Email Signature Line
You have the opportunity with every email you send to anyone—client, potential client, friend, colleague, stranger you just met on the airplane—to promote your Pinterest and gain followers. Simply add the dedicated URL of your Pinterest to the end of your signature line, where the links to your other social media (website, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn) live, and allow people to follow you with a single click.

7. Reciprocate
A good best practice is to always check out a new follower, or someone who has liked or repinned one of your images, and consider whether you want to follow them back. Some of the criteria to take into account include:

  • Are they a major player in the same space? If so, consider following them, since your audiences are likely to be the same.
  • Are they pinning interesting, beautiful, or highly informative content? If yes, they’re worth following as a regular resource for repinning.
  • Are they someone on whose radar you’d like to be? Following someone increases the chances they’ll follow you back and gives you regular opportunity to comment, like, and repin their images.

Get your 4 free bonuses here: http://bit.ly/PKaren

50 Ways to Use Pinterest For Your Business. A cheat sheet of Bronze-, Silver, and Gold-Level Tips.

Bonus Chapter 18: Pinterest in 15 Minutes a Day available online only, this chapter shows you how to make the most of Pinterest Monday – Friday, in just 15 minutes a day.

Pinterest Podcast: 14 Types of Boards Every Business Should Consider Creating with Karen Leland, author of Entrepreneur Magazine’s Ultimate Guide to Pinterest for Business and President of Sterling Marketing Group.

Pinterest Webcast: If you are new to Pinterest, or want to up your game, this short and information-packed webcast will show you the best ways to use Pinterest to promote your book, business, or product.

 

Karen Leland is the bestselling author of 8 business books including the recently released Entrepreneur Magazine’s Ultimate Guide to Pinterest For Business, which can be purchased at http://bit.ly/Amazonbook. She is the president of Sterling Marketing Group, where she works with small businesses and Fortune 500 on building stronger personal and team brands. She writes the Modern Marketing Blog at www.karenleland.com.


French, Sass, and Snoot: Your body and tone do the talking

 

By Susan Harrow, Media Coach & Author of Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul

 

What do a French woman, LA hipster and prissy librarian have in common?

You can tell who they are as much by their tone as by the way they dress, talk and act.

Remember that we judge you in the first three seconds – three seconds – so tone is as important as your visual appearance, body and facial language. Take care that you are the message you want to give.

A colleague said that he wasn’t sure that all three women were really me. Yup, that’s me.

Please weigh in. Which babe is your fav?

For more media coaching and publicity tips, and some outrageous, shocking and provocative stuff that may tick you off or tickle you I invite you to subscribe to my new YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/SusanHarrow


What Poet Laureate W.S. Merwin Says About How to Set Yourself Up for Success

 

By Susan Harrow, Media Coach & Author of Sell Yourself Without Selling Your Soul

Here’s the question people often wrestle with when promoting themselves or embarking on a publicity campaign. How do I gracefully move from private person public persona. This is as much about temperament as it is about the desire for a more “exposed” life. Hear what W.S. Merwin says and what author and speaker Sam Horn discovered when she met him.

 

What Poet Laureate W.S. Merwin Says


Media Training for CEOs: Shrinking Attention Spans Demand Shorter Sound bites

The late ABC Anchor Peter Jennings noted, “I find writing the evening news sometimes very challenging because I realize that what we’re trying to give folks in the evening is black and white when so often I want to give them gray.” That same frustration is only exacerbated these days for media and communicators alike. Bottom line: There is a place for nuance. It’s just a small place.

Attention spans have shrunk to the size of a Nike Swoosh. But one reason why the conservative right is so successful is that they give audiences one side and one side only. It’s simplistic, but it’s clear.

While I’m not advocating simplifying issues devoid of nuance, what I am suggesting is that to help your CEO or spokesperson learn the game that gets ink, you must help him or her develop a million-dollar tongue.

A large part of that involves delivering concise sound bites the media will use.

I love poetry and nuance and subtlety. It saddens me that the place for it in the media is almost as extinct as the White Rhino. I’ve frequently said to my clients that the art of sound bites is like taking War and Peace and turning it into a haiku.

Learning to speak “sound bite” is like learning a new language. Here are some ways to do that without selling your soul (or losing your message):

Speak so you can’t be edited.
I media coached a former Jesuit priest for CBS’ “60 Minutes” who was protesting the sexual harassment he had endured that led him to leave the priesthood. The show was called “Is the Catholic Church above the Law?” I played Mike Wallace. He got Morley Safer. He said the interview was easy after what I put him through. He was positioned positively. It could easily have gone the other way—except for one thing: When I taught him to only speak phrases that couldn’t be truncated and spliced to change his meaning, the six hours of taping that was edited down to five minutes turned in his favor.

Does this take lots of practice? Yes. But it can be done. The harder you are on your CEO or spokesperson, the better it is for him. Better you making him sweat and swear than Mike Wallace. By the way, the case went all the way to the Supreme Court and he won.

Create modular sound bites.
I was media coaching a CEO of an up-and-coming company positioning itself to go public. The company was targeting business shows on MSN, CBS, CNN and wanted to attract investors. We created sound bites to include facts about the company’s financial well being, about the internal health of the company and employee happiness, and the ways that they were innovators in their field. Plus the company was growing fast, adding new stores nationwide at record speed, while staying in the black.

We took those same stories and angled them for the company’s other two audiences: consumers and trade. And we worked the CEO’s passion for fly-fishing into the mix, which brought out his sweetness.

Pro tip: Work with your CEO or spokesperson not to memorize talking points, but to make them modular—to flex his ideas into different shapes and sizes for different audiences. Make him human and lovable by establishing some key stories about his personal life, which exemplify how well he leads her people—which is what we really want to see. We need more leaders and fewer protectors of the bottom line.

Move people with your good spirit.
Words are less important than you think, likability more. In the Gallup poll taken during each presidential election since 1960, the candidate who scored highest in the likeability category has won every election.

Making your CEO likable is crucial to his success in the media.

I was working with a CEO of a popular magazine who had a brilliant mind, was a talented athlete, but wooden.

As soon as I encouraged him to speak of his youngest daughter, his whole demeanor softened. His VP of PR cooed, “Oh, you just got soooo handsome.” It was true.

Once I coached him to speak from that place of the pride and love he had in his daughter he could talk about the difficult situation in his industry that directly impacted his magazine—formerly a stumbling block—with ease and grace.

The more open your CEO or spokesperson is, the more powerful he is. Practice having him remain open and loving when you grill him with tough questions.

That may sound ridiculous, but when we speak as if we were addressing a beloved child it’s pretty hard for the media to retaliate with the same vehemence than toward a man holding a sword ready to strike.

Spending time with your CEO or spokesperson to hone his sound bites, body and facial language to suit any situation will help make rich poetry in troubled times.

Download the free special report 5 Awesome Tips To Prepare For a TV Interview.